2,269 research outputs found

    “It’s Hard Out Here if You’re a Black Felon”: A Critical Examination of Black Male Reentry

    Get PDF
    Formerly incarcerated Black males face many barriers once they return to society after incarceration. Research has long established incarceration as a determinant of poor health and well-being. While research has shown that legally created barriers (e.g., employment, housing, and social services) are often a challenge post-incarceration, far less is known of Black male’s daily experiences of reentry. Utilizing critical ethnography and semi-structured interviews with formerly incarcerated Black males in a Northeastern community, this study examines the challenges Black males experience post-incarceration

    A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experiences of African American Males\u27 Challenges in Post Incarceration

    Get PDF
    This purpose of this phenomenological study is to understand the lived experiences of African American males in the state of Delaware post-incarceration. Incarceration disproportionately affects African American males leading to numerous difficulties during their transition back into the community. The research sought to comprehend the myriad of challenges and identify potential support systems to help facilitate successful reintegration. By utilizing a qualitative research approach, the study employs in-depth interviews to collect data from African American males who have experienced life post-incarceration. The analysis of the data incorporates elements of critical race theory and labeling theory to unravel the interplay of systematic racism and societal perceptions in shaping their reentry experiences. The study used in-depth interviews to explore the perspectives, emotions, and perceptions of each participant while focusing on the participants’ encounters with different societal systems such as family, housing, employment, and community support. The study also examined how societal stigmas and racial discrimination has impacted participants’ reentry process and shaped their identities. The findings of the study revealed that post-incarceration life for African American males was loaded with numerous challenges. Participants expressed feelings of distrust, alienation, discrimination, and stigmatization leading to difficulties in securing various necessities such as housing, employment, and family reconciliation which ultimately hindered the participant from a fresh start. These insights provided an understanding of the lived experiences of African American males’ post-incarceration and provide implications for societal interventions. By addressing these concerns that perpetuate recidivism, society can employ a more inclusive environment that supports successful reintegration

    Behold, she stands at the door: Reentry, black women and the black church

    Get PDF
    This paper examines the African American church’s response to the special problems of African American women who reenter the community post-incarceration. The first portion of the paper examines the impact of criminal justice policies on women of color and the attending problems of reentry which resulted. It then surveys the black church’s response to returning citizens, especially women. It concludes by proposing shifts in perspectives and theologies which create barriers to successful reintegration into the community at large, and the church in particular. The intended audience is individuals and faith communities who seek to work effectively with returning women

    The Effects of Rehabilitation on the Ability to Reintegrate into Society

    Get PDF
    With crime and recidivism rates so high in the United States, a focus on reintegration and rehabilitation are key in order to allow these individuals to be productive, successful members of society upon release. The following research will investigate the struggles of post-incarceration life for several individuals in a particular rehabilitation program and try to understand how the program they are a part of is aiding them with these struggles. Factors detrimental to reintegration, protective factors against recidivism, environmental factors that aid reintegration, and employment post-incarceration will be examined to gain a better understanding of the life ex-offenders face and what it takes for them to re-enter society successfully

    Exploring Mental Health Services for Women Post Incarceration

    Get PDF
    Background: In recent years, the number of women incarcerated has increased at a rate higher than men. Drug and social policies related to employment, housing, education, welfare, mental health, and substance abuse treatment make it difficult for women to succeed once released from prison or jail. Women with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders are a high-risk population for negative post-release outcomes. For the majority of prisoners experiencing psychological distress during incarceration, distress persists after release. Unfortunately, contact with mental health services in the community by ex-offenders is low. Further research is needed to understand the barriers to seeking these services. Aim: Explore the social behavioral factors that contribute to mental health of women recently released from prison or jail by: (1) reviewing the current programs available for women who need mental health services after prison release, (2) synthesizing the peer-reviewed literature -evaluating the effectiveness of community reentry programs with a mental health service component and (3) identifying future research and policy needs to better address mental health needs of women post incarceration and reduce recidivism. Methods: A literature review was conducted to assess the structure of current community reentry programs and evaluate the effectiveness of community reentry programs with mental health service components. Conclusion: There is need for more gender specific mental health reentry programs for women. Men account for 90% of the incarcerated population, and as a result reentry programs are predominately created for men. Community reentry programs that focus on cognitive behavior theory rooted in the power of individual choice must also ensure that they prepare ex-offenders to deal with unexpected barriers to social services such as housing, employment, food stamps, and health insurance. There is need for more outcome evaluations of existing reentry programs and reentry programs that include tools that measure mental health outcomes during release

    Community Reintegration of Persons with SMI Post Incarceration

    Get PDF
    This issue brief provides an overview of specialized services and programs that support ex-inmates with severe mental illness (SMI) returning to the community post release, with particular attention given to the Massachusetts’ Forensic Transition Team (FTT) model

    The Case of Reintegration of Women Post Incarceration

    Get PDF
    Women released from prison or jail face particular obstacles and challenges on reentry to the community, many of which are related to their childhood and to gender roles as women and mothers. This study relates the lived experience of one woman\u27s successful transition to economic and mainstream societal reintegration and family reconnection after release from prison and the insights gained by the researcher. Case study methodology congruent with Miller\u27s Relational-Cultural Theory philosophical framework was utilized in this in-depth, single case design and represents a unique case. The overall purpose of this descriptive and explanatory research was to explore precursors to criminality particular to women and the connective constructs enabling cognitive, psychological, and behavioral lifestyle change. This qualitative study was a step in understanding how a formerly incarcerated woman successfully overcame obstacles to reconnection, employment, and reintegration into society, leading to the discovery of a structure comprising four major themes, nine minor themes, and three sub themes. Factors initiating a turning point related to the participant\u27s dramatic, life-changing spiritual experience and resulting dynamic motivation; factors affecting reentry into the community were apparent in the participant attending college, obtaining a job, and reconnecting with significant family members; factors influencing the journey to jail were represented as clarity of lifestyle consequences to self and others; factors affecting reentry into the community were associated with understanding of self and others, increased confidence and self-esteem, and excelling in college and work; and factors supporting and maintaining successful reintegration were exampled by relational reconnection, mentoring opportunities, and community involvement. Implications for further research were uncovered through better understanding of the life experiences leading to a spiritual, life-changing choice and subsequent successful reintegration of the participant post incarceration

    Experience of Stigma Post Incarceration: A Qualitative Study

    Get PDF
    Background: Minimal attention has been given to the perspectives and experiences of individuals post incarceration regarding stigma and its impact on reintegration and occupational engagement. This research aimed to understand how stigma is experienced among individuals who were formerly incarcerated and its influence on occupational engagement, specifically social participation, work, and school occupations. This research also examined the role of occupational therapy as an intervention in addressing stigma from the perspectives of individuals who were formerly incarcerated to inform practice and mitigate the influence of stigma. Method: Interviews were conducted with 10 participants of a work rehabilitation program for people who had previously been incarcerated. A thematic analysis was performed to identify major themes. Themes were organized into concept maps related to stigma as experienced by those who were formerly incarcerated. Results: Four overarching themes emerged. These themes, internal and external perceptions, and family and community systems, served to enable as well as disable the impact of stigma on daily life post incarceration. Conclusion: The themes presented increased the understanding of stigma as experienced by individuals who were formerly incarcerated and supported the need for further research and occupational therapy programming specifically aimed at minimizing the impact of stigma

    Increasing Post-Incarceration Education within Juvenile Detention Centers

    Get PDF
    Juvenile offenders often lack support for developing post-incarceration plans such as college or career options, which can lead to higher recidivism and escalation to becoming long-term, adult offenders. While some juvenile detention centers have on site schools, the curriculum neglects discussing future goals and career planning. In order to address this problem, I created a three day presentation for incarcerated youth at the Napa County Juvenile Detention Center in Napa, California about college majors and careers that do not require higher education

    A Systematic Review of Technology Interventions for Justice-Involved People

    Get PDF
    More than 2.3 million people are held in incarceration in the US with a high recidivism rate, high substance use disorders (SUD) percentage, and 3 times higher HIV infection than normal Americans. Unfortunately, this group receives inadequate preparation opportunities and assistance during their reentry into their communities. Smartphones and other mobile devices are widely accessible for justice-involved people (JIP) post-incarceration despite the variations of socioeconomic groups. Mobile phone ownership reached 96% in 2019 in the US, 71% of the low-income population have smartphones. Hence, technology interventions may be a way to reach out to this group and effectively intervene and assist them with their needs. Multiple technology intervention studies for the post-incarceration period were identified for JIP. To the best of our knowledge, there are no systematic reviews that evaluated the effectiveness of the current technology interventions targeting the needs of JIP post-incarceration. The purpose of this research is to identify the gaps in the current knowledge base and determine new research questions to advance the technology interventions targeting JIP post-incarceration. To achieve our goal, we conducted a systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) checklist. The search queries include mobile phone or app or smartphone or “mobile app*” or mHealth or “mobile health” with incarcerat* or recidivis* or justice-involve* or jail or prison* or parole* or probat* or reentry, with either (SUD or OUD or substance use disorder*” or addict* or intervention) or (Job or employ* or housing or food or transport* or child* or *care or course* or financ* or support or educat*). We limited our search to (i) titles and abstracts, (ii) full-text English-language articles, (iii) published from 2010 (the smartphone era started in 2007 and had been prevailing since 2010) to 2021, (iv) in peer-reviewed journals and conferences. A total of 610 papers were identified, after removing duplicates and papers that do not meet the inclusion criteria, 22 papers were included for our literature review. Multiple technology interventions focused on SUD, HIV, other diseases, and their feasibility and effectiveness. Only a few interventions targeted job search, technical literacy, and case management. No study focused on other important areas, such as housing, financial support, childcare, food, and transportation. Three main research themes were identified: access to treatment, access to employment, and self-management support. In conclusion, mobile technology interventions are feasible and effective in assisting people post-incarceration. However, studies that were applied in isolation may limit the effectiveness of new interventions, because all the factors are dependent on each other. A holistic technology intervention platform to addresses different needs and provide diverse assistance simultaneously to support a successful reentry is recommended for future research
    • …
    corecore