17,087 research outputs found

    Second Meeting of the Committee on Governance and Popular Participation

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    African civil society organizations (CSOs) form a sector that has become increasingly important over the past few decades in terms of its participation in the development and governance processes as well in global policy processes. This report highlights the impact and effectiveness of the participation of CSOs and NGOs in promoting development and governance in Africa

    Rwanda’s ordinary killers: interpreting popular participation in the Rwandan genocide

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    This paper examines the question of why so many ordinary Hutu participated in genocidal killing of Tutsi in Rwanda in 1994. I find that mass mobilisation was contingent on the fulfilment of two main conditions. Firstly it required a mindset – the internalisation of a set of historical and ideological beliefs – within the Hutu population. These were predominantly beliefs in a historical Hutu oppression at the hands of Tutsi and in an ideological definition of the ongoing civil war as an ethnic one, a Tutsi attempt to reinstate this historical order. Secondly, it required the commitment of State institutions to the genocidal project. This commitment provided the initial trigger, legitimacy and impunity for civilian participation in an anti-Tutsi programme. However, once triggered the degeneration into genocidal violence was the product of a complex interaction of other motives ranging from coercion, opportunism, habituation, conformity, racism, and ideological indoctrination

    Popular participation and rural development

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    Brazils Independence and Popular Participation

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    This paper aims to approach the process of Brazil s independence aiming to deconstruct the image that national independence was peaceful In this sense it seeks to emphasize the role of the wars in the independence approaching the case of Bahia paying attention to the popular participation with emphasis on the role of wome

    Popular participation in Cochabamba, Bolivia as an ameliorative policy treatment affecting public education.

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    Popular Participation is a public policy characterized by decentralization and devolution of responsibility and resources for a wide range of public services, including public education, from the national to the municipal level, with the objective to solve or ameliorate three historical and typical problems of Latin American developing nations: corruption in government interactions, lack of government legitimacy and an enduring rural/urban divide. This study analyzes the effectiveness of the Bolivian Popular Participation law (1994) through policy study from 2000--2004, including fieldwork in Cochabamba, Bolivia, in 2002. The policy research focused on Popular Participation and successive policy initiatives that modified or impacted public services, particularly public education. The fieldwork in Cochabamba focused on civil society and government interactions regarding public education. This study finds that in the Bolivian response to development initiatives, Popular Participation is not functioning as intended. Rather than reducing corruption, the research found a tendency toward increased bureaucratization which nullified civil society's ability to monitor government. Rather than increasing the legitimacy of the government, the trend has been toward an increase in normalization of relations between government and civil society, in that the political space created by Popular Participation has been systematically marginalized or co-opted. The rural/urban divide has not been reduced; rather, the study reveals a tendency to recast active participation as passive observation, particularly in policy documents, and this passive observation occurs so late in the policy process as to be ineffective. Poststructuralist critiques of the development discourse offer a useful framework for understanding Popular Participation in the Bolivian context

    Popular Participation in Decentralized Governance: With Especial Emphasis on Adi-Haki Local Administration, Mekelle City

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    The study examines the aspects related to the level of popular involvement, mechanisms to improve and barriers in decentralized governance in Adi-Haki local administration in Mekelle City from the point view of citizens, councilors, public officials and civil society organizations. The paper seeks to find out who are the governance actors that participate in different stages of the governance process and the level of their involvement. The research is conducted on a representative samples at the local administration level. It was based on 200 questionnaires filled in and 180 returned by the respondents and interview with councilors, public officials and civil society organizations. The novelty of the research lies in the fact that it was based on triangulation both on the officials and citizens, perception about popular participation in decentralized governance. The research shows that there is low level of popular participation in the decentralized governance process with inadequate space provide to the actors and in sufficient means for popular participation. The research provides with enough evidences to characterize the local administration in Mekelle city as a form of consultation according to the Arnstein’s ladder of popular participation

    Adam Ferguson on partisanship, party conflict, and popular participation

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    Adam Ferguson has usually been portrayed as an advocate of conflict, political parties, and factional strife. This article demonstrates that this is a rather unbalanced reading. A careful investigation of Ferguson's works and correspondence in context reveals a man deeply troubled by both turbulence and party politics. He consistently expressed fears of what he saw as the tumultuous populace, and the willingness of party leaders to rise on the shoulders of the mob. This could ultimately lead to military despotism, something he dreaded. While Ferguson's theory of antagonistic sociability was original, this article shows that we should not take for granted that it implied an approval of party conflict in a broad sense. Indeed, he was highly critical of opposition parties seeking to replace the government. He did tolerate a regulated form of contest between different orders in the state under a mixed constitution, but it is here argued that he is much better understood as a Christian Stoic promoting stability and order than a supporter of party struggle

    Popular Participation: Why do People Participate in Amateur Theatre?

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    There are about sixty amateur theatre companies in Iceland. Hundreds of people every year participate in various theatrical activities, from staging large and intricate produc­tions to smaller and more intimate readings and programs, attending workshops and seminars, writing plays both short and “full-length”, meeting in groups not only to re­hearse but to practice and develop theatrical crafts. None get paid. Some are even ready to part with fairly large sums for aforementioned workshops and seminars. All of them put in untold work hours and a lot of effort – after they get done with their day jobs. These are not “professionals”. Mostly, they don’t want to be. They have no inter­est in pursuing a theatrical career for a living. They just want to make theatre.In my article I explore what it is that people experience when participating in amateur theatre.  The paper will mainly be based on a number of in depth interviews I con­ducted in 2009 and 2010 with people from the Selfoss Amateur Theatre Company, as well as my own experience of being a member of the same company for the last 25 years. Using analytical tools such as thematic analysis and Richard Schechner’s perfor­mance process as a time-space sequence I explore how making theatre creates communities and worlds and gives the participants freedom to let loose and play, if only for a time
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