1,006 research outputs found

    Editor\u27s Introduction

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    Disease, Institutions and Underdevelopment

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    What explains poverty of Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia? One view holds the disease environment of these regions as the primary culprit. Others see it as a typical symptom of growth retarding institutions. We test validity of these competing assertions for a cross section of countries. Our results indicate that institutions are the prime determinant of economic performance of countries. Disease does not play a significant role in determining outcomes. On the contrary, we find support for the indirect effect of disease via institutions, as asserted by the 'institutions school'. Interestingly, the 'institutions school' contention about geography having no direct effect on income is also not validated. Our results show that being land locked can pose significant disadvantage for a country. Endowment of hydrocarbon, however, is beneficial for economic outcomes.Economic Performance; Institutions; Disease

    Disease, Institutions and Underdevelopment

    Get PDF
    What explains poverty of Sub Saharan Africa and South Asia? One view holds the disease environment of these regions as the primary culprit. Others see it as a typical symptom of growth retarding institutions. We test validity of these competing assertions for a cross section of countries. Our results indicate that institutions are the prime determinant of economic performance of countries. Disease does not play a significant role in determining outcomes. On the contrary, we find support for the indirect effect of disease via institutions, as asserted by the 'institutions school'. Interestingly, the 'institutions school' contention about geography having no direct effect on income is also not validated. Our results show that being land locked can pose significant disadvantage for a country. Endowment of hydrocarbon, however, is beneficial for economic outcomes.Economic Performance, Institutions, Disease.

    A Field Guide for Weathering: Embodied Tactics for Collectives of Two or More Humans

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    In our inherited meteorological practices and frameworks, weather conditions are managed for us in a range of ways (for example, through architecture, technology, commodity culture, infrastructure, economic rationale). This field guide brings the weather back to the body. A traditional field guide provides tools for the individual sovereign human subject to observe and document nature “over there”. In contrast, through a range of different activities, our field guide not only invites investigation and cataloguing of the field that we also comprise, but also challenges what counts as a noteworthy observation regarding the weather and also climate

    GPS Measurement Protocol

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    The purpose of this resource is to determine the latitude, longitdue, and elevation of your school and of all your GLOBE sites. The GPS receiver will be used to determine the latitude, longitude and elevation of your school or of your GLOBE sites. Educational levels: Primary elementary, Intermediate elementary, Middle school, High school

    Changing economic geography and vertical linkages in Japan

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    In Japan, the manufacturing has become geographically dispersed in the 1990s, when the import has drastically increased after the historic exchange rate appreciation. This suggests the possibility that regional input-output linkages are undermined by import penetration. The regression results indicate the decline of industrial concentrations, particularly those previously established near large output absorbers. This paper also finds that local knowledge spillovers and availability of immobile specialized labor affect regional growth. These imply that the geography matters for industrial locations rather through the supply of inputs, especially non-tradable inputs, than through the demand for tradable outputs.

    Architectural design education through history of architecture: the lesson of Bruno Zevi

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    Ponencia presentada a Session 3: Educación y arquitectura en las universidades / Architectural education in the universitiesBruno Zevi, born in 1918 and died in 2000, is one of the most important Italian theorists of architecture. His anti-historical and critical reading of the classical historiography has highlighted a different architectural geography, recognizing the merits of that architecture which had been improperly defined as minor or peripheral. His reading method aims to minimize the contemplative attitude in favour of the involvement and the actualization of the history of architecture, far from a historicist vision that prevents from reading the past as an irreplaceable occasion to understand and deal with the contemporary season of architecture. In his vision of history as a “methodology of architectural practice" he draws not a philological portrait of the past, but a breeding ground for "extracting the forgotten subversive components". According to Italo Calvino’s statement, a classic (in art, literature, music, architecture etc.) is something that has never finished saying what it has to say; Bruno Zevi strengthens the concept emphasizing that when good architecture of the past was built, the solutions adopted were most of the times extremely modern, so they are worth to be analysed to understand processes and ideas they subtended, and actualised in contemporaneity. Thus, it is important to learn history of architecture by the methodology of investigating what the masters of the past wanted to achieve rather than the final building just as a successful solution. It is a complex and engaging method because it is not only about “knowing how to look at architecture" but he sets forth new categories of judgment that enables to learn and judge contemporary architecture and the urban aspects, in an actualization that becomes immediate. It is very useful to unleash oneself, as Zevi suggests, from that compact vision of the historiographical process like the ones handed down to us by the various Giedions, for instance to reconsider the contributions that would make the architectural periods of Countries considered "peripheral", substantial. This useful means of updated reinterpretation can be of educating and stimulating for planning in today’s cities, considering that it is also able to define new aspects and contradictions in the history of so-called “official architecture”. This paper will focus on the strong interaction suggested by Bruno Zevi between the architectural design education and the history of architecture as methodology of teaching, considering several examples extrapolated from his numerous texts

    Who counts? Gender, gatekeeping, and quantitative human geography

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    How academic disciplines are represented and reproduced is a charged issue. In geography in particular, the challenge is not only who counts, especially with regard to gender and other factors, but also how the boundaries of the discipline are drawn and which subfields are acknowledged. This article contributes to both aspects of the discussion by extending recent research on gender, internationalization, and academic gatekeeping to additional subfields of human geography. In particular, we focus on the demographic structure and international diversity of the editorial teams of flagship quantitative geography journals. We find that women are underrepresented in our sample, with shares ranging from 23.1 to 43.5 percent—numbers unfortunately comparable to many other geography journals. We also find that career stage is an important factor and that our sample is more international and less Anglophone than the disciplinary norm. We conclude by emphasizing the importance of attending to issues of inclusive gatekeeping in geography and elsewhere.PostprintPeer reviewe

    Geography Rules Too! Economic Development and the Geography of Institutions

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    To explain cross-country income differences, research has recently focused on the so-called deep determinants of economic development, notably institutions and geography. This paper sheds a different light on these determinants. We use spatial econometrics to analyse the importance of the geography of institutions. We show that it is not only absolute geography, in terms of for instance climate, but also relative geography, the spatial linkages between countries, that matters for a country’s gdp per capita. Apart from a country’s own institutions, institutions in neighboring countries turn out to be relevant as well. This finding is robust to various alternative specifications.

    Perception of Disease Risk and Vulnerability as a Function of Proximity to National Park Boundaries in East Africa

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    Studies suggest households closest to parks and protected areas (PAs) are more likely to sustain park-related losses, but the relationship between human sickness and PAs has not been fully explored. Existing literature primarily focuses on human-wildlife conflicts (i.e. crop raiding) and the potential for zoonotic disease spillover and emergence at the human-livestock-wildlife interface at PA boundaries. Understanding local perceptions of disease risk and vulnerability is essential for assessing human health relative to conservation areas. This understanding will promote better-informed consideration of human health impacts in decision making for conservation. Data from surveys taken at 301 households around Kibale National Park (KNP), an important conservation area, were used to identify risk perception and factors influencing perceived disease risk and vulnerability. Human sickness was the most frequently cited worry by respondents (88%) and malaria was the most frequently cited illness (80.1 %). Those living closer to PAs may be at greater risk for park-related harm and cited more frequent cases of malaria and non-malarial fever. The perception of high risk for human sickness is pervasive across the region independent of household distance to the park and actual disease risk
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