4,256,304 research outputs found

    Fiscal Year 2006 Annual Report on the Operations and Accomplishments of the Office of the General Counsel

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    [Excerpt] The Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 amended Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) to give litigation authority to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and provide for a General Counsel, appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate for 4-year term, with responsibility for conducting the Commission\u27s litigation program. Following transfer of enforcement functions from the U.S. Department of Labor to the Commission under a 1978 Presidential Reorganization Plan, the General Counsel became responsible for conducting Commission litigation under the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA) and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA). With the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the General Counsel became responsible for conducting Commission litigation under the employment provisions of that statute (Title I; effective July 1992). The mission of EEOC’s Office of General Counsel (OGC) is to conduct litigation on behalf of the Commission to obtain relief for victims of employment discrimination and ensure compliance with the statutes that EEOC is charged with enforcing. Under Title VII and the ADA, the Commission can sue nongovernmental employers with 15 or more employees. The Commission’s suit authority under the ADEA (20 or more employees) and the EPA (no employee minimum) includes state and local governmental employers as well as private employers. Title VII, the ADA, and the ADEA also cover labor organizations and employment agencies, and the EPA prohibits labor organizations from attempting to cause an employer to violate that statute. OGC also represents the Commission on administrative claims and litigation brought by agency applicants and employees, and provides legal advice to the agency on employment-related matters

    Women of Color in the Private Sector: Their Employment in the Private Sector

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    [Excerpt] This examination of the employment status of minority women or women of color relies primarily on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC’s) EEO-1 report. Characteristics of employment are examined from five different perspectives: total employment, employment by job group, employment of officials and managers, the movement of women from white collar to management positions and per capita charge rates by industry. The report seeks to capture these measures using the most recent EEO-1 data from 2001 and by examining recent trends from 1990. It also utilizes charge receipt data. The annual EEO-1 report indicates the composition of an employer’s workforces by sex and by race/ethnic category. The EEO-1 collects data on nine major job categories: (1) officials and managers, (2) professionals, (3) technicians, (4) sales workers, (5) office and clerical workers, (6) craft workers, (7) operatives, (8) laborers and (9) service workers. Race/ethnic designations used are White (not of Hispanic origin), Black (not of Hispanic origin), Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander (Asian), American Indian or Alaskan Native (Native American). In addition to the workforce data provided by the employer, information about each establishment is added to the database. This includes the establishment’s North American Industrial Classification System code and, in early years, added the Standard Industrial Classification code

    Women of Color: Their Employment in the Private Sector

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    This examination of the employment status of minority women or women of color relies primarily on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission\u27s (EEOC) EEO-1 report. Characteristics of employment are examined from five different perspectives: total employment, employment by job group, employment of officials and managers, the movement of women from white collar to management positions and per capita charge rates by industry. Among the conclusions included in the report: race/ethnicity and industry both have an effect on per capita charge rates; firms in Engineering and Management Services are least likely to be the subject of a charge by each of the minority groups of women, except Asian women; Automotive Dealers and Service Stations is consistently ranked among the industries with the highest per capital charge rates; Construction-based industries, such as Special Trade Contractors and General Building Contractors, have high per capita charge rates for both African American women and Hispanic women. The highest ranked industry with highest level of per capita charges by Asian women is Apparel and Other Textile Products and for Native American women it is Social Services

    Glass Ceilings: The Status of Women as Officials and Managers in the Private Sector

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    The main purpose of this report is to use data from the 2002 EEO-1 Survey of Firms in Private Industry to explore the status of women in management. The research will develop some new ways of analyzing the EEO-1 data that focus on access to management positions generally, and perhaps more importantly, access to management positions at headquarter facilities. The primary contribution of these analyses of the EEO-1 survey is the ability to raise important problems and questions about gender-based discrimination given the wide variations in the types of firms and industries in the American economy. While this initial report on glass ceilings focuses on the status of women, the analyses developed here can be applied to examine minority groups

    Diversity in the Finance Industry

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    The Finance Industry is an important aspect of the economy including banking, credit, securities and insurance activities. It offers many well-paying jobs, and is expected to see growth in the coming years. This report examines the Finance Industry with respect to the employment of women, African Americans, Hispanics, Asians and American Indians /Alaskan Natives. Of particular interest is the status of these groups in management positions. EEO-1 data is utilized to examine the subsectors of the Finance Industry. • The percentage of women officials and managers is highest in the Banking/Credit subsector (48.6 percent) and their lowest percentage is in the Securities subsector (33.8 percent). The percentage of women officials and managers in each of the subsectors falls below the percentage of women employed as professionals, which might be considered a source for management jobs. • Similar disparities between the percentage of African American officials and managers and the percentage of African American professionals are also observed. Among the Financial Industry subsectors, the percentage of African American officials and managers is highest in the Banking/Credit subsector (7.0 percent) and lowest in the Securities subsector (4.4 percent). • The percentage of Hispanic officials and managers is highest in the Central Banking subsector (5.1 percent) and lowest in the Securities subsector (2.9 percent). In all subsectors, the percentage of Hispanic officials and managers is less that the percentage of Hispanic professionals. • The highest percentage of Asian officials and managers is in the Securities subsector (6.4 percent) and the lowest percentage of Asian officials and managers is in Central Banking and Insurance (2.8 percent). Like the other groups examined, the percentage of Asian officials and managers falls below the percentage of Asian professionals in each subsector. • Employment as officials and managers is examined in more detail for each of these groups by determining their chance of being officials and managers in contrast to professionals and sales workers. This shows that each subsector has a large portion of establishments where such chances are unfavorable to women, African Americans, Hispanics and Asians when compared to white males. Entry into management may be a particular concern for Asians. • While the relative chance of being an official or manager is better in the Securities subsector for each of the groups analyzed, the low proportion of women and African American professionals in this subsector may be partly responsible for these results

    Diversity in the Media: a Chart Book for Selected Industries

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    [Excerpt] This chart book responds to the public’s request for data regarding diversity in employment among some of the key media industries in the nation. The data provided here can be used by employers in these industries to evaluate their employment practices. This effort is consistent with the emphasis on proactive prevention in the Commission’s Five Point Plan. These data come from EEO-1 reports filed in 2002 and information for the three industry groups are based on the North American Industrial Classification System. This publication provides a brief graphical overview of the three industry groups: • Newspaper/Periodical/Book/Database Publishers • Radio and Television Broadcasting • Cable Networks and Program Distributio

    Retail Distribution Centers: How New Business Processes Impact Minority Labor Markets

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    [Excerpt] As part of the emphasis on proactive prevention in the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC’s) Five Point Plan, this report seeks to aid retailers and similar employers in taking full advantage of America’s labor markets. Our nation’s retailers fulfill an important role in our economy and according to the EEOC’s EEO-1 reports in 2002, employ nearly 15 percent of all private sector employees. In this second in a series of reports on this important industry, this report examines a unique sector of retailing: distribution centers. In contrast to traditional warehouses, a modern distribution center is essentially an operations center, managing the flow of information and goods between retailers and suppliers through the use of standardized bar codes, high-speed conveyors, laser scanners, and computerized databases. These distribution centers represent not only a significant change in the way retail firms operate, but unlike store fronts they are often not very visible to the general public. These centers are commonly located away from central cities, either outside metropolitan areas altogether or on the edge of such areas. In searching for inexpensive land, favorable leases and low tax rates, retailers can easily lose sight of the value of a diverse workforce. This report attempts to alert retailers and others to the potential impact that distribution center location can have on the ability to develop and maintain a multi-cultural workforce. Readers, especially retailers, are encouraged to share their best practices in making location decisions for distribution centers in a manner that encourages a diverse work force

    The Achiever Nov./Dec. 2013

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    From The Director 1 Holiday Party 1 Financial Aid News 2 EOP Honors Banquet 3 XAE News 4 Support Groups 4 Academic Service 6 Farewell Gabe Marshall 6 Student Spotlights 7 Hispanic Heritage Celebration 8https://digitalcommons.brockport.edu/eop_news/1011/thumbnail.jp

    Ram Opportunity

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    RAM Opportunity is a self-sustaining mentoring and experiential learning program designed to serve high school students in the local community through programs led by graduate student mentors. RAM Opportunity operates using a plug-and-play structure that can be implemented in the arts, business, education, humanities, sciences, or any other discipline. Partnerships will be formed with local high schools and their guidance counseling services to develop a pipeline for potential students to participate in the program. The program benefits VCU by enhancing engagement with the local community, generating interest in high school students pursuing post-secondary education at VCU, and developing graduate students by providing professional development funding and real-world teaching and mentoring experience

    Atlanta Metropatterns

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