42 research outputs found

    Unusual heavy landing of rays and skates at Tuticorin Fisheries Harbour

    Get PDF
    Tuticorin coast is known for the rich elasmobranch resources consisting of sharks, rays and skates. However, the landing of the resource was declining over the years. Elasmobranchs are mainly caught by trawlers, hooks and line and gillnets. At Tuticorin Fisheries Harbour (TFH), which is one of the major landing centre along the Gulf of Mannar (GOM) coast, the trawl fishery was excellent when fishing resumed on 30th May 2009 after the 45 day monsoon ban. On 15th of July 2009, unusual heavy landing of rays and skates was noticed (Fig. 1). The landing of rays and skates on this day alone was estimated as 33.3 t consisting of nine species of rays and four species of skate

    Field Identification of Rays and Some Common Flatfishes of India

    Get PDF
    This suborder includes all of the Eagle Rays (Myliobatidae), Cownose Rays (Rhinopteridae) and the Mobulid Rays and includes about 40 species which are characterized by diamond shaped bodies and wing-like pectoral fins which they use to propel themselves through open water. Eagle Rays and Cownose Rays feed on the seabed, using their mouths to dig amongst the substrate in search of buried molluscs and crustaceans, while the mobulid rays lead a complete pelagic life. The order has 8 families under it

    Field Identification of Major Elasmobranchs along the Indian Coast

    Get PDF
    Elasmobranchs are an important group of demersal fishes which are represented by sharks, skates and rays. India is the world’s second biggest shark fishing nation next to Indonesia. They belong to the Class Elasmobranchii under the Phylum Chordata. Sharks are caught with various gears like drift gillnets, longlines, hooks and line units and are landed throughout the year. They feed on bony fishes, other sharks, rays, crustaceans and squids

    Seasonal Composition of Finfish in Waters Behind the Virginia Barrier Islands

    Get PDF
    Semi-monthly sampling of finfish was conducted in the lagoons and marshes behind Parramore and Cedar Islands at Wachapreague Inlet, Cobb and Wreck Islands at Sand Shoal Inlet, and on the northwest side of Fisherman Island from September 1986 through September 1987. Although all lifestages were collected, the study was designed to focus on utilization of this area by juvenile finfish. Sixty-nine species offinfish were collected. Species diversity and abundance fluctuated widely among seasons. Both were highest in the fall and lowest in the winter. The most abundant species over all seasons and locations were silversides (Menidia menidia) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). The most abundant commercially and recreationally important species collected were summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) and the sciaenids, croaker (Micropogonias undulatus ), spot (Leiostomus xanthurns) and weakfish ( Cynoscion regalis ). As adults, these species migrate inward in the spring and leave in the fall, but newly recruited juveniles were found utilizing these areas almost all year. Comparisons were made with results from the only other directed study in this area (Richards and Castagna, 1970). Differences between the results of these two studies can be attributed to gear (size of trawl net mesh) and site (salinity and relative position in marsh)

    An overview of the hooking mortality of elasmobranchs caught in a swordfish pelagic longline fishery in the Atlantic Ocean

    Get PDF
    Hooking (or “at-haulback”) fishing mortality was analysed in elasmobranchs captured by Portuguese longliners targeting swordfish in the Atlantic Ocean. Information was collected by on-board fishery observers who monitored 834 longline fishing sets between August 2008 and December 2011, and recorded information on 36,067 elasmobranch specimens from 21 different taxa. The hooking mortality proportions were species-specific, with some species having relatively high percentages of live specimens at time of haulback (e.g., blue shark, crocodile shark, pelagic stingray, manta, devil and eagle rays), while others had higher percentages of dead specimens (e.g., smooth hammerhead, silky shark, bigeye thresher). For the most captured species, logistic GLMs were carried out to compare the mortality rates between sexes, specimen sizes and the regions of operation of the fleet. The sex-specific proportions of hooking mortality were significantly different for blue and crocodile sharks, with the males of both species having higher proportions of hooking mortality than the females. Specimen size was significant for predicting the hooking mortality for blue and shortfin mako sharks: in both cases, the larger specimens had lower odds of dying due to the fishing process. There were differences in the hooking mortality depending on the region of operation of the fleet, but those differences were also species-specific. For blue and crocodile sharks, the hooking mortality was higher in the Equatorial and southern Atlantic areas (when compared to the NE Atlantic region), while the opposite was observed for the shortfin mako, with lower mortality rates in the NE tropical area compared with the other regions. The results presented in this paper can be integrated into future ecological risk assessment analysis for pelagic elasmobranchs. Furthermore, the new information can be used to evaluate the impact of recent recommendations prohibiting the retention of some vulnerable elasmobranch species

    Extinction Risk and Bottlenecks in the Conservation of Charismatic Marine Species

    Get PDF
    The oceans face a biodiversity crisis, but the degree and scale of extinction risk remains poorly characterized. Charismatic species are most likely to gar- ner greatest support for conservation and thus provide a best-case scenario of the status of marine biodiversity. We summarize extinction risk and diagnose impediments to successful conservation for 1,568 species in 16 families of marine animals in the movie Finding Nemo. Sixteen percent (12–34%) of those that have been evaluated are threatened, ranging from 9% (7–28%) of bony fishes to 100% (83–100%) of marine turtles. A lack of scientific knowledge impedes analysis of threat status for invertebrates, which have 1,000 times fewer conservation papers than do turtles. Legal protection is severely deficient for sharks and rays; only 8% of threatened species in our analysis are protected. Extinction risk among wide-ranging taxa is higher thanmost terrestrial groups, suggesting a different conservation focus is required in the sea

    Palauan Fish Names

    Get PDF
    Palauans have names for most fishes of importance to them. Three hundred thirty-six vernacular fish names and their 312 scientific equivalents are listed. Palauan names show little similarity to Yapese and Guamanian names. Different native names exist for different life stages and sexes of many fishes, and some variation in names occurs between northern and southern Palau. Earlier publications of Palauan fish names are discussed
    corecore