253 research outputs found

    The Effects of Music Genre on Cycling Performance and Perceived Exertion

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    Many people claim that music enhances their exercise experience. To our knowledge, no studies have analyzed the effect of music genre on exercise performance and perceived effort. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of music genre on effort as well as perceived exertion while exercising. Methods: Eighteen untrained individuals, age 18-22, participated in this study. Participants performed two 25-minute exercise trials on a Monark bicycle ergometer. Participants were randomized to a music genre (either hip-hop, country or classical) and to condition (music or no music). Rating of perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR), and resistance were recorded for the first ten minutes, while the same three measures and total calories burned were recorded for the final fifteen. Results: No significant difference was found in RPE between music and no music (p=0.477). The results of the Tukey post-hoc showed a significant increase in caloric expenditure between country music and hip-hop music (p=.008). There were no differences in RPE (F2,17=1.45, p=0.265) and music preference (F2,17=3.21, p=0.069) across genre. Conclusion: Based on these results, exercise performance and perceived effort were similar with or without music. When examining the effects of music genre, listening to country music increased caloric expenditure when compared to hip-hop music

    Efectos de la música sobre el rendimiento físico-motor: una revisión sistemática de la literatura científica

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    La música para hacer ejercicio se ha convertido en una herramienta de uso regular tanto para deportistas como para personas que llevan a cabo alguna actividad física más o menos ocasional, de ahí el objetivo de indagar sobre los efectos que la música tiene a nivel físico-motor. Para esto se llevó a cabo una búsqueda con la utilización de las palabras claves: “music and exercise” y “music and performance” en la base de datos de SPORTDiscus, donde se obtuvieron 442 artículos de texto completo de los que, tras ser revisados, se seleccionaron 39. Los criterios para excluir los artículos fueron: estudios con poblaciones clínicas, artículos que incluyeran temas de psicología como cohesión de equipo, ansiedad, entre otras, no incluir el rendimiento como variable dependiente o donde se combinaba la música con algún otro tipo de refuerzo, por ejemplo: baile, frases de apoyo o dinero. Entre los resultados más importantes están que la música mejora el rendimiento en ejercicio aeróbico y anaeróbico, disminuye la percepción de la fatiga y genera cambios a nivel cardiovascular y hormonal. En conclusión los beneficios que se encontraron en materia de música y ejercicio se obtienen tanto antes, como durante y después de haber llevado a cabo la actividad física.The music for exercise has become a common tool used by athletes and people who do physical activity with more or less regularity; in this context, the aim of this paper is to look at the physical-motor effects produced by music. For this was conducted a search using the keywords: "music and exercise" and "music and performance" in the database SPORTDiscus, where 442 full-text articles were obtained, which were reviewed and only selected 39. The criteria to exclude articles were: studies with clinical populations, articles including issues of psychology (motivation, cohesion of team, anxiety, among others), not include the performance as dependent variable or where it was combined music with some other type of reinforcement, for example: dance, phrases of support or money. Among the most important results are that music improves performance in aerobic and anaerobic exercise, decreases the perception of fatigue and causes changes in cardiovascular and hormonal level. In conclusion the benefits found in the field of music and exercise are obtained both before, during and after carrying out physical activity

    Working it Out: Examining the Psychological Effects of Music and Exercise and Exploring the Theoretical Background of Health Behaviors

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    Exercise has been linked to mood benefits, and music may increase these effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the psychological effects of music and exercise. Exercise was hypothesized to increase mood more significantly in those who listened to music. Listening to music while exercising was also hypothesized to lead to lower perceived exertion and higher exercise enjoyment. Participants (N = 148) completed 20 minutes of moderately-paced walking, either with or without a personal music player. Exercise significantly increased mood in all measured dimensions. Exercise enjoyment was significantly higher among participants who exercised with music and music moderated the effect of exercise on post-exercise pleasantness. The psychological effects of music while exercising are discussed with possible applications to maintaining exercise adherence

    Use of self-selected, synchronous music as an ergogenic aid in workout performance: A mixed-methods study

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    The present study investigated the use of self-selected, synchronous music as an ergogenic aid in workout performance by evaluating measures of heart rate and RPE and participant interviews. Male and female participants (n=9) performed a workout of five exercises (bicep curl, military press, wide stance leg press, leg extension, and tricep kickback), under three different music conditions (when listening to self-selected, synchronous music, when listening to researcher-selected synchronous music, or when listening to a metronome set at 120 bpm). The quantitative portion of the study found that there was no significant impact of self-selected, synchronous music upon participant mean heart rate or RPE based on music condition. However, the qualitative interviews of the study provided support for use of self-selected music during exercise. Given these results and potential to improve workout performance, more research is needed on the use of self-selected, synchronous music and exercise

    P-06 Effectiveness of Exercising with Music

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    Effectiveness of Exercising with Music. Abstract Several research has been made by many psychologists and health professionals around the world about exercising and listening to music for meditation and relaxation. Everyone regardless of what age group, surely are aware and have knowledge regarding the health benefits associated with exercise and have a general interest in listening to good music while they drive or when they cook in the house just to have some fun twist to what they are doing so they don’t feel bored. So here we are trying to see how both exercise and music work together whether they have more health benefits than usual since most people feel excited, joyful, stressless or even motivated with music. And people who have religious belief would feel more empowered when they listen to their spiritual music with meaningful lyrics which will inspire them in different ways. Sometimes exercising silently can make you feel like a burden to workout but with music you can feel encouraged. People often listen to music simply because their work feels lighter and more pleasurable with music than like a tiring duty, but they seldom realize how many benefits are associated to this pairing of music of our choice with exercise. Exercise not only maintains our outward appearance by keeping our physical body fit, toned and slim. It also helps in the physiology of human body where it stimulates almost all the organs inside our body and promotes good metabolism, digestion, excretion and even detoxifies. On the other hand, music plays an excellent role in relaxing our muscles and by activating our brain cells in releasing happy hormones like adrenaline and serotonin that keep us joyful and positive which will obviously improve our overall health. Since health is not defined as not having a disease but it involves a complete well-being of a person physically, psychologically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually as defined by WHO. Our aim here is to bring about a change in the lifestyle of people so they can live a peaceful and harmonious lives regardless of what painful situations they may be going through because life is a gift of God and our body is the temple of God so we have to be happy in ourselves and keep our bodies functioning well just as they have been created so wonderfully by our creator God almighty

    Perceived importance of components of asynchronous music in circuit training

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    This study examined regular exercisers’ perceptions of specific components of music during circuit training. Twenty-four men (38.8 years, s = 11.8 years) and 31 women (32.4 years, s = 9.6 years) completed two questionnaires immediately after a circuit training class. Participants rated the importance of 13 components of music (rhythm, melody, etc.) in relation to exercise enjoyment, and each completed the Affect Intensity Measure (Larsen, 1984) to measure emotional reactivity. Independent t tests were used to evaluate gender differences in perceptions of musical importance. Pearson correlations were computed to evaluate the relationships between affect intensity, age and importance of musical components. Consistent with previous research and theoretical predictions, rhythm response components (rhythm, tempo, beat) were rated as most important. Women rated the importance of melody significantly higher than did men, while men gave more importance to music associated with sport. Affect intensity was found to be positively and significantly related to the perceived importance of melody, lyrical content, musical style, personal associations and emotional content. Results suggest that exercise leaders need to be sensitive to personal factors when choosing music to accompany exercise. Qualitative research that focuses on the personal meaning of music is encouraged

    Memory, Memes, Cognition, and Mental Illness – Toward a New Synthesis

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    What are the ergogenic effects of music during exercise?

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    This synthesis demonstrates the positive effects of music on exercise. It focuses on the potential benefits of listening to music during exercise. It uses a theoretical framework focusing on the dissociative effect of music resulting in reduced perceived exertion, accompanied by greater output, enhanced performance, improved skill and improved mood. It also looks at the effects of variable intermediaries of the tempo and the volume of the music being used. It uses twelve, peer-reviewed, quantitative research journal articles published within the past forty years as the “critical mass.” Using the theoretical framework the synthesis demonstrates that the dissociative effect of music enhances exercise and achieves the potential benefits. It recommends future research over a wider age range and varied exercises

    On the role of lyrics in the music-exercise performance relationship

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    This is the post-print version of the final paper published in Psychology of Sport and Exercise. The published article is available from the link below. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. Copyright @ 2013 Elsevier Ltd.Objectives - To examine the role of lyrics on a range of psychological, psychophysical, and physiological variables during submaximal cycling ergometry. Design - Within-subject counterbalanced design. Method - Twenty-five participants performed three 6-min cycling trials at a power output corresponding to 75% of their maximum heart rate under conditions of music with lyrics, same music without lyrics, and a no-music control. Cycling cadence, heart rate, and perceived exertion were recorded at 2-min intervals during each trial. Positive and negative affect was assessed before and after each trial. Results - Participants cycled at a higher cadence towards the end of the cycling trials under music with lyrics. Main effects were found for perceived exertion and heart rate, both of which increased from min 2 through to min 6, and for affect: positive affect increased and negative affect decreased from pre- to post-trials. Conclusions - Participants pedalled faster in both music conditions (with and without lyrics) while perceived exertion and heart rate did not differ. The inclusion of lyrics influenced cycling cadence only at min 6 and had no effect on the remaining dependent variables throughout the duration of the cycling trials. The impact of lyrical content in the music–exercise performance relationship warrants further attention in order for us to better understand its role
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