41 research outputs found

    “A Certain Stigma” of Educational Radio: Judith Waller and “Public Service” Broadcasting

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    This paper explores Judith Waller’s radio programming philosophy over her career that began in 1922 at WMAQ Chicago. In the 1940s, representing the interests of her employer NBC, Waller began to use the phrase “public service” as a way to break free of the “stigma” of educational radio. The concept of public service programming shifted during the 1930s and 1940s in the US, redefined and negotiated in response to assumptions about radio listeners, the financial motivations of commercial radio, and Federal Communications Commission rulings. This paper brings renewed attention to the past and present political economy of media in the US, providing a window into the historically complex relationship between commercial and noncommercial media that continues to this day

    Only the Sound Itself? : Early Radio, Education, and Archives of \u27No Sound\u27

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    Sound Recognition of Historical Visibility: The Radio Preservation Task Force of the Library of Congress: Introduction

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    This issue of Journal of Radio & Audio Media serves as a gesture toward increasing attention to many untold cultural sound histories. The “question” of radio preservation, we’re just coming to realize, closely equates to our responsibility to identify gaps within our historical record, as those gaps are delineated along race, class, orientation, and gendered lines. Sound preservation turns out to be one strategy for how to reconcile failures of recognition. It’s widely accepted that a historian must not project a different meaning upon historical materials than its author intended. Yet at the same time historians might now play the role of advocates, by increasing representation through digital preservation. Sound history is one of the last frontiers to build paths of visibility among scattered records. The Radio Preservation Task Force (RPTF) of the National Recording Preservation Board of the Library of Congress represents one such project. National in scope but local in focus, the RPTF is currently in the process of constructing several interconnected initiatives that will culminate in a detailed mapping of the cultural history of radio, so as to reveal previously hidden experiences, events, and perspectives

    Marriage is the Foundation of the Family

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    A History of Educational Radio in Chicago with Emphasis on WBEZ-FM, 1920-1960

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    Bulletin of the Rhode Island Library Association v. 7, no. 1

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    https://digitalcommons.uri.edu/rila_bulletin/1035/thumbnail.jp

    Bulletin of the Rhode Island Library Association v. 7, no. 1

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    https://digitalcommons.uri.edu/rila_bulletin/1035/thumbnail.jp

    Commencement, 1978

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    Program for the One Hundred Forty-First Commencement of Marshall University

    ‘New and important careers’: how women excelled at the BBC, 1923–1939

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    From its beginnings in 1923, the BBC employed a sizeable female workforce. The majority were in support roles as typists, secretaries and clerks but, during the 1920s and 1930s, a significant number held important posts. As a modern industry, the BBC took a largely progressive approach towards the ‘career women’ on its staff, many of whom were in jobs that were developed specifically for the new medium of broadcasting. Women worked as drama producers, advertising representatives and Children’s Hour Organisers. They were talent spotters, press officers and documentary makers. Three women attained Director status while others held significant administrative positions. This article considers in what ways it was the modernity and novelty of broadcasting, combined with changing employment possibilities and attitudes towards women evident after the First World War, that combined to create the conditions in which they could excel

    The Linden Bark, April 12, 1949

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    Student Newspaper of Lindenwood Collegehttps://digitalcommons.lindenwood.edu/linden_bark/1267/thumbnail.jp
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