108 research outputs found

    Bucknell Honors W&M Law Dean

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- James P. Whyte, Jr. dean of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary, was given an award Saturday by Bucknell University for meritorious achievement. The award to Whyte, a member of the Bucknell class of 1943, was for his practical vision in legal education and his abilities as a labor-management arbitrator and specialist in constitutional and criminal law. Whyte earned his law degree from the University of Colorado and has been a member of the W&M law school faculty for 16 years and dean since 1970

    J.P. Whyte Is Appointed W&M Dean

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- James P. Whyte, Jr., acting dean of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary for the past year, has been named dean, it was announced yesterday. Dr. W. Melville Jones, vice president for academic affairs at William and Mary, said Whyte\u27s selection was approved by the executive committee of the college\u27s board of visitors after a 10-month search. Dr. Davis Y. Paschall, college president, said Whyte has been largely responsible for the improved facilities, larger enrollment, and increased resources at the law school. Whyte, a member of the law faculty here 12 years, is a native of Mississippi and a graduate of Bucknell University and the University of Colorado law school. He was a prosecuting attorney in McAlester, Okla., and a lawyer for a pipeline firm in Kansas City, Mo., before coming to William and Mary. He serves as a judge for labor arbitration panels of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, the American Arbitration Service and Association, and the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry. During World War II, he was a naval commander, a trial and defense counsel for general courts martial. Whyte is married and the father of three sons. His wife is a former member of the Williamsburg School Board. The law school here has about 200 students and a faculty of 15

    Protest at W&M Hits Intervention

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- Outside intervention in the selection of faculty members was condemned Tuesday in a resolution adopted by the faculty of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary. In a direct reference to statements by State Sen. E.E. Willey of Richmond regarding the appointment controversy involving attorney JeRoyd X. Greene, the resolution said the faculty reaffirms its intention to develop a faculty composed of the best qualified individuals without improper intervention from any sources outside the college. Willey, in a letter to the law school dean, James P. Whyte Jr., questioned Greene\u27s appointment as a teacher in the law school and said his appointment would influence Willey\u27s attitude toward future appropriations for the law school. Although there was no mention of Willey by name in the resolution, the law faculty said it emphatically condemns any act or statement by any person or agency, public or private, that threatens or attempts to effect any reprisal or duress against this law school . . . The statement was issued shortly after a law school faculty meeting at which time William and Mary President, Dr. Thomas A. Graves Jr., spoke for the first time personally regarding his decision not to appoint Greene as visiting associate professor of law. The board of visitors on May 18 concurred in Graves\u27 decision. Later in the afternoon the American Association of University Professors held a meeting at William and Mary open to any member of the faculties at the college. Ronald C. Brown, an associate professor of law and new AAUP chapter president at William and Mary, said the meeting was to explain the guidelines of the AAUP and to outline the background of the organization\u27s process of gathering information on the Greene case

    Clark Praises Judicial System

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Tom C. Clark said here Wednesday that he hoped there was no obstruction of justice on the part of President Nixon during the Watergate affair. Talking to reporters following a program at the College of William and Mary, Clark said that obstruction of justice is one of our gravest offenses, because it destroys the very system we live by. He said that he had not read all the details of the Watergate tape transcripts. His comments on Watergate were made in response to a question regarding Nixon and discussions with aides about hush money for Watergate defendant E. Howard Hunt. I\u27m not saying there was any kind of obstruction of justice, Clark emphasized, I\u27m just saying that I hope it didn\u27t occur. Clark was on the Supreme Court from 1949 until he retired in 1967. The recent trial of former Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell and former Commerce Secretary Maurice H.Stans showed the strength of our judicial system in that 12 people have the courage to stand up and make important decisions, he said. Clark was on the W&M campus Wednesday as part of Law Day 1974 program sponsored by the Marshall-Wythe School of Law here, the W&M Student Bar Association and the Norfolk-Portsmouth Bar Association. During the ceremony, Clark was recognized as one of the nation\u27s most successful and illustrious jurists by Dean James P. Whyte of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law, who presented Clark with the school\u27s Marshall-Wythe medallion, an award reserved for selected leaders of the legal profession. As another part of the Law Day observance, Judge John A. MacKenzie, federal district judge for the eastern district of Virginia, presided over a special session of Federal District Court convened here to naturalize 124 persons from the Tidewater area as U.S. citizens. Following the ceremony, Clark spoke to about 400 persons. He said that the great test of democracy is what it puts in the hearts, minds, and purposes of its citizens

    New Building Called Cure for W&M Law School Ills

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- A new building for the Marshall-Wythe school of law at the College of William and Mary will solve the current accreditation problem, Law School Dean James P. Whyte said Tuesday night. Our major problem is space . . . in the library, and we have no place to turn but to a new building at this point, he explained. A staff report issued earlier in the day in Richmond by the State Council of Higher Education said that the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools feel that state support of the William and Mary law school is submarginal and that accreditation of the law school is submarginal and that accreditation of the law school is, therefore, in jeopardy until deficiencies are corrected. Whyte said he believed that to say our accreditation is in jeopardy is a bit of an overstatement. We\u27re not on the verge of going out of existence. Frankly, we need to sit more people in our library . . .We need more space for the number of students enrolled. He explained that among the accreditation requirements for law schools is the provision for a certain amount of student study space to be located within the library. We just no longer have that space. The growth of our library collection is crowding the students, and the students are crowding the collection, he added. Requested for 1976-78 Realizing several years ago that rapid growth of the law school in the late 1960s would soon exceed present facilities, the William and Mary administration, along with the support of then Gov. Linwood Holton, requested a new $4.8 million law school building for the 1976-78 biennium. In final action, the General Assembly earlier this year, in an across-the-board trim, eliminated the law school building from the budget, but did provide funds to enable the architectural planning for the new project to begin. The General Assembly also provided funds in its budget for the upgradings of the law school, with additional salary supplements and library assistance. Aware of Report General Assembly funding specifically for the law school was immensely helpful, said Dr. Thomas A. Graves, Jr., William and Mary president. He said he and Whyte were aware of the accreditation report. We\u27re making every effort here at the college and in the law school, Graves said, to rectify the situation in terms of financing, resources and facilities available to provide a quality legal education. But another major step, which will make all of the difference in the world would be the final funding [by a General Assembly] of a new law school building. Dr. Graves explained that once the new law school facility is built and once funds are obtained for that facility to provide a quality education, we\u27re going to be in good shape and can do the job that needs to be done. Once you get up to a certain level of funding and hold your own, that funding is sufficient, he said. He added, however, that the college will not ask for the 1975 General Assembly for funds to construct the new law school building. We\u27ve been asked only to submit a request [for funds] if they are absolutely of an emergency nature, Dr. Graves said. I talk in terms of critical need and absolute need when I talk about a new law school building . . . But I can not honestly tali about the new project as an emergency. Dean Whyte said he was certain that the accreditation agencies will give us plenty of time to secure our new building and meet their requirements

    Greene to Give Seven Lectures at W&M

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- Richmond lawyer Jeroyd X. Greene, denied a position in the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary last spring, will deliver a series of seven lectures at the college beginning Nov. 18. Greene has been invited to deliver the lectures by an ad hoc group of 45 faculty and administration members, each of whom has pledged to donate one day\u27s pay to cover Green\u27s costs. In a statement announcing the lecture series Wednesday, the group said that Greene\u27s opinions warrant the serious consideration of this community. We trust that our voluntary commitment of funds will enable us and our students to have the kind of creative dialogue with Mr. Greene that would have been possible had he been appointed to a position on the faculty. Greene\u27s lectures, to be delivered over the next four months, will have as their theme law, justice and racism. According to Greene, the lectures are an attempt to analyze and articulate the growing feeling among racially and economically disenfranchised groups in this country that there is, in fact, no justice for them in the courts of this nation. The William and Mary board of visitors voted last spring not to hire Greene, following the recommendation of President Thomas A. Graves Jr., after Greene had already been offered a part-time position on the law school faculty by law school Dean James P. Whyte Jr. News of the law school\u27s overtures to Greene brought criticism. State Sen. Edward W. Willey of Richmond, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, said in a letter to Whyte that if Greene were hired it would influence Willey\u27s support for appropriations to the law school. Graves\u27 Stand Graves, in recommending to the visitors that Greene\u27s appointment not be approved, noted that Greene had been held in contempt of court several times. The first for Greene\u27s lectures will be delivered on successive Monday night at 8 o\u27clock in Millington Auditorium. After a break for the holidays, the series will resume at 8 p.m. Jan. 27 and continue the next two Monday nights. The last lecture, to be delivered Feb. 10 in Phi Beta Kappa Hall, will be Greene\u27s discussion of his own case. A graduate of the Yale law school, Greene was honored Nov. 2 in New Orleans by the National Conference of Black Lawyers as the outstanding black lawyer of the year

    W&M Law School Agrees to Alter Enrollment Ratio

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- The Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary plans to increase its ratio of in-state students in the 1974-75 academic year, college officials said Monday. In response to a query from the Times-Dispatch, William and Mary President Dr. Thomas R. Graves, Jr. said the college is prepared to move toward a ratio of 70 per cent in-state students and 30 per cent out-of-state students as long as the quality and quantity of Virginia applications hold up. The current in-state, out-of-state ratio at the law school is 60-40. Response to Stone The action by Graves and Law School Dean James P. Whyte was a response to a letter from State Sen. William F. Stone of Martinsville, chairman of the Legislative Commission for Higher Education. Stone had written in March to Graves and Dr. Edgar F. Shannon Jr., president of the University of Virginia, requesting that the law school at each institution take additional steps to accommodate more Virginia residents or face a quota system on out-of-state students, or, possibly, establishment of a third state-supported law school. Shannon said last week that he had directed the university law school to increase its enrollment from 330 students to 350. Prepared to Change Graves said Monday that he had informed Sen. Stone in April that William and Mary was prepared to change its in-state ratio in the law school in order to respond to current application pressure and to lessen the current and temporary problem. It was learned that William and Mary\u27s out-of-state ratio in its law school had been as high as 50 per cent in recent years, but that figure has been lowered in the past couple of years. We believe that to go beyond the 70-30 ratio in the short run, Graves said, might have a negative effect on the character and image of the law school and its ability to be of maximum service to the State of Virginia in preparing its citizens for careers in law. Graves said Sen. Stone has not contracted the college concerning Graves\u27 April letter on the proposed ratio change. The proposed law school ratio is the same as the one that has been established by the William and Mary Board of Visitors for undergraduate admission. Dr. Graves told the Times-Dispatch that in the past three years the law school has doubled in size to its present enrollment of approximately 450 students. This increase in enrollment has caused serious difficulties with overcrowding in the current physical facilities for the law school, Graves said. The law school could not be reasonably expected to increase beyond its present size until new and expanded facilities are available. Present plans call for the renovation, in 1975 or 1976, of adjacent Rogers Hall, currently a chemistry building, for use as library and classroom space by the law school. The students are now crowded into the Marshall-Wythe Building, which was renovated for the school about six years ago when the law school enrollment was less than 200. Regarding a proposed third state-supported law school, Dr. Graves said that while he has no authority, he believed it would be unwise to invest in a third law school when most observers felt that the crush of law school applicants would be reduced in the next two or three years. The State Council of Higher Education has reported that state and private law schools plan expansions which, by 1977, will provide 380 additional places

    W&M Law Situation Is \u27Tense\u27

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- The quiet, serene atmosphere of students busily studying for examinations these days at the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at The College of William and Mary belies the tense situation which the school and college officials currently face. The underlying feeling is caused by the controversial, proposed appointment of black Richmond lawyer Jeroyd X. Greene as visiting associate professor at the nation\u27s oldest law school. Greene would be the law school\u27s first black professor. Added to the tense feeling have been indications from Richmond State Sen. Edward E. Willey that state financial aid might be in jeopardy if the school hires Greene. Greene has said he will sue the college if the board of visitors fails to approve his contract at its meeting here this weekend. In past years the law school faculty has been noncontroversial and has been working quietly, according to Dean James P. Whyte Jr., to improve on what we believe is a good operation. However, even current law school students and faculty will candidly acknowledge that several years ago, of the four law schools in Virginia -- at the University of Richmond, University of Virginia, Washington and Lee University and at William and Mary -- the Williamsburg school probably ranked last because the school was not widely known. There were several reasons. The school was small then, with only about a hundred students in the mid-1960s, compared with today\u27s enrollment of about 450. The staff, likewise, was small and there was virtually no special funding for the school. Admission demands also were not pressing because the school was not widely known. But times changed, and fortunately for William and Mary and Marshall-Wythe, the school was able to begin to move with the times. Demands for admission to law schools across the country grew and William and Mary began to receive its share of those demands. To meet that particular challenge, then William and Mary president Dr. Davis Y. Pashcall, working with law school officials, pressed for new expanded quarters for the school and its library. For 188 years, off and on, the law school had lived in temporary quarters. From 1953 until 1967 it was housed on two floors of a men\u27s dormitory. In September 1967, the school moved into its first permanent home, then spacious Marshall-Wythe Hall, the old college library building, renamed in honor of the law school. But the law school quickly outgrew its space and now the school again faces need for more space. Also, for accreditation purposes, it needs a larger library. The growth in students and staff has made a better law school, said Whyte. We increased enrollment to increase competition and therefore, quite naturally, had to expand our faculty and curriculum. Whyte feel that this law school\u27s academic strength lies in the fact that Marshall-Wythe, like the undergraduate strength at William and Mary, gives people here a well-rounded education. In this case, he said, for the general practice of law. Whyte said he has received many complimentary letters from alumni who stress that their education at the law school was broad and strong. After schooling here, he said, they can then seek their own specialty. The school\u27s own program of tax law and the masters of law in taxation is known and respected on the east coast. And the school\u27s annual tax conference draws participants -- attorneys, students, accountants and other business and professional groups -- from a four-state area. The Greene controversy is the first widespread controversy the law school has experienced since the summer of 1965 when a law school in Litchfield, Conn., suggested that it, not Marshall-Wythe, was the oldest law school in the nation. It was called another Virginia-New England controversy over a historical priority. Existing faculty records at the college show that the country\u27s first chair of law -- a school, as law was taught then by students studying under a practicing lawyer -- was established here on Dec. 4, 1779. The venerable George Wythe, in whose Williamsburg law office Thomas Jefferson had studied for four years, was selected by the college\u27s board of visitors as its first law professor. Wythe, a signer of the Declaration of Independence and a member of the federal Constitutional Convention, also taught John Marshall, later chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and James Monroe, the nation\u27s fifth president. Law was classified as a department at William and Mary until the school was established in 1953. The courses offered qualified to be accredited as a law school in 1932. The great leader in the resurgence of law and the development of the modern school was the late dean, Dr. Dudley W. Woodbridge. Known as a teachers\u27 lawyer Woodbridge achieved national prominence in 1950 when Life magazine called him one of the nation\u27s top eight professors. Today, Marshall-Wythe School of Law has 19 full-time professors, a dean and two associate deans who also are on the teaching faculty. There are two part-time librarians and a law librarian and assistant. There is one woman professor, Dr. Erma M. Lang, who joined the faculty last September as visiting associate professor of law. Whyte said he is hopeful that Dr. Lang will remain as a permanent staff member. There are 457 students at the school, of whom nine are black. There are 62 women. This fall, the school will enroll between 150-165 students selected from more than 2,300 applications. The ratio of in-state to out-of-state students is 60-40. Whyte said, and of the recent graduates, about half have chosen to remain in Virginia in private practice. The National Center for State Courts decision to establish its headquarters here in Williamsburg was another plus for the law school. There will be a significant relationship between the law school and the national center because of the center\u27s selection of a site on William and Mary property. Because of the site selection and continuing law school growth, the college, with the backing of former Gov. Linwood Holton, asked the 1974 General Assembly for 4.8milliontoconstructanewlawschoolcomplexadjacenttothecourtscenter.Holtonrecommendedtheprojectinhisbudgetrequest,butwhenGov.MillsE.GodwinJr.tookofficehereallocatedsomebudgetfunds,andthelawschoolproject,alongwithnearlyallothermajorcapitaloutlayprojectsinhighereducation,wasdeferred.Thelawschool,however,received4.8 million to construct a new law school complex adjacent to the courts center. Holton recommended the project in his budget request, but when Gov. Mills E. Godwin Jr. took office he reallocated some budget funds, and the law school project, along with nearly all other major capital outlay projects in higher education, was deferred. The law school, however, received 218,250 in planning money for the new facility. The school also received specially allocated funds totaling 300,000forthenextbienniumasanenrichmentprogramforfacultysalariesandthelawlibrary.Withthesefundsthetotalteachingbudgetfornextyearwillprobablybemorethan300,000 for the next biennium as an enrichment program for faculty salaries and the law library. With these funds the total teaching budget for next year will probably be more than 500,000. \u27Those enrichment funds were critical, Whyte said. We were slipping into a position where we could get good faculty members, but without property funding and therefore salaries, we could not hold them. The courts center will certainly provide an opportunity for us to develop programs in judicial administration, Wythe said, unlike any other such program in the country, and the upgrading of salaries, the faculty believes, will make recruiting of professors less difficult. William and Mary alumni readily admit that the standing of the school is based nationally on its faculty and their qualifications, as well as its alumni and their positions of achievement and influence. Since 1953, the small school of Marshall-Wythe, operating as a real modern law school, has graduated only about 1,000 students and their records are still being measured

    W&M Law School Names Donaldson Associate Dean

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- John E. Donaldson, 32, a native of Richmond, has been appointed associate dean of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary, effective Sept. 1. Donaldson, who was promoted to the rank of full professor in June, had served for two years as an assistant vice president of the college while continuing to teach part-time in the law school. James P. Whyte, dean of the law school, in announcing Donaldson\u27s appointment, said the position of associate dean would be enlarged to give Donaldson considerable responsibility in the areas of law school admissions and placement, as well as in other administrative activities. He said Donaldson would continue to teach in the area of tax law. Prior to joining the William and Mary law faculty in 1966, Donaldson served as an attorney in the office of the chief counsel, Internal Revenue Service. Since 1968, he has been a consultary to the IRS

    Plans for Legal Center at W&M Unveiled

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    WILLIAMSBURG -- Final architectural plans for the new National Center for State Courts and the proposed law school building at the College of William and Mary were made public Thursday. The adjoining structures are scheduled to be constructed on college property near the main campus and the Colonial Williamsburg historic area. The court center will cost approximately 2.75millionandthelawschoolstructure,whichstillmustreceivefinalapprovalin1976fromtheVirginiaGeneralAssembly,willcostabout2.75 million and the law school structure, which still must receive final approval in 1976 from the Virginia General Assembly, will cost about 4.8 million Funds for Center Officials of the national court center could not be reached Thursday night, but funds necessary for construction of the project have been virtually assured and construction is expected to begin in midsummer. It is anticipated that the faculty will be occupied at some time in 1976. The court building has been designed by Richmond architectural firm of Wright, Jones, and Wilkerson, Inc., which is also designed the law school. The two-story court center will have 32,000 square feet of floor area to accommodate a staff of 60. The building will have dual entrances through two-story arches providing access to the lobby from the main circular drive and adjacent law school mall. Facilities will include a flexible modular office complex, which will surround a functional law and technical library and be connected to the diredtor\u27s suite, board room, and conference facilities. The building is designed to permit modest expansion. Traditional Style The building will be a traditional style that combines contemporary design with traditional motifs and material and will be constructed of natural materials such as molded brick, stone and slate, integrating the building with its surroundings. The National Center for State Courts was first suggested in Williamsburg in 1971 and is dedicated to judicial reform at the state court level. A major selling point for Williamsburg in the effort to get the court center to locate here was the fact that the Marshall-Wythe School of Law at William and Mary could be located on adjacent property. The college received planning money from the 1974 General Assembly for the law school building and plans call for a two-story building with 80,000 square feet, consisting of units of various functions located to take maximum advantage of the terrain. Ground Floor The ground floor will contain a library unit, an administrative unit, and an academic wing, all connected by a central lobby-lounge. The academic wing will be located along one of the several ridges extending back into a wooded area and will allow for tiered lecture rooms to be built on the natural grade. The wing will have four lecture rooms, two seating 150 and two seating 90 persons. The second floor will contain another library unit and a similar academic wing. These units will be connected by a faculty office suite above the lobby-lounge. In addition to offices, the faculty suite will contain a workroom, lounge and outdoor garden court, and will be provided with direct access to the academic, library, and administrative areas. According to Dean James P. Whyte of the Marshall-Wythe School of Law, the proposed facilities will serve a student body expected to reach 600 students. The new law library will house more than 140,000 volumes and provide 420 study stations. The school\u27s library volumes are housed in cramped quarters at the law school and in the basements of Bryan, Madison and Camm dormitories
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