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    Identity

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    The concept of identity has begun to be employed only relatively recently in economics, and accordingly still lacks a standard meaning and established set of applications in the subject. However, in its most influential initial uses by Amartya Sen (1999) and George Akerlof and Rachel Kranton (2000) it has been developed largely in terms of the concept of social identity (though in quite different ways). Social identity as understood in social psychology (see Brown, 2000), where the concept was influentially developed by Erik Erikson in connection with his idea of an identity crisis (Erikson, 1950), concerns individuals’ ‘identification with’ social groups of which they are members. There are different ways of understanding the idea of ‘identification with,’ with both more psychological and sociological types of interpretations, but generally it means that individuals treat the characteristics of the social group with which they identify as their own individual characteristics, for example, as when people think of themselves as individuals having a certain nationality, gender, or religion. Akerlof and Kranton, then, adopt this sort of understanding when they rewrite the standard utility function representation of the individual to include a vector of self-images which people are said to have in virtue of their having corresponding characteristics associated with certain social groups. Sen employs the same idea that social group characteristics and social identities are applied to individuals and influence how they think of themselves, but in contrast he also argues that individuals deliberate over whether to embrace these assignments

    Identity

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    Identity

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    I explore proposals for stating identity criteria in terms of ground. I also address considerations for and against taking identity and distinctness facts to be ungrounded

    An Evening with Dolores Huerta

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    “An Evening with Dolores Huerta” was Latino Heritage Month\u27s signature event. The American labor leader and activist spoke on Thursday, Sept. 29 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the DeRosa University Center ballroom. Huerta has spent decades championing the rights of farm workers and women. She founded the Agricultural Workers Association and later launched the National Farm Workers Association with Cesar Chavez, which became the United Farm Workers of America. Huerta has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in 2012. A Stockton-native, Huerta attended Delta College (then part of Pacific) in the early 1950s, where she earned a teaching credential. She was awarded an honorary doctorate from Pacific in 2010.Free event, open to the public. First-come, first-served with limited capacity

    Racial & Identity Profiling Advisory Board Annual Report 2020

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    California’s Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory Board (Board) is pleased to release its Third Annual Report. The Board was created by the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015 (RIPA) to shepherd data collection and provide public reports with the ultimate objective to eliminate racial and identity profiling and improve and understand diversity in law enforcement through training, education, and outreach. For the first time, the Board’s report includes an analysis of the stop data collected under RIPA, which requires nearly all California law enforcement agencies to submit demographic data on all detentions and searches. This report also provides recommendations that law enforcement can incorporate to enhance their policies, procedures, and trainings on topics that intersect with bias and racial and identity profiling. This report provides the Board’s recommendations for next steps for all stakeholders – advocacy groups, community members, law enforcement, and policymakers – who can collectively advance the goals of RIPA. In rendering these recommendations, the Board hopes to further carry out its mission to eliminate racial and identity profiling and improve law enforcement and community relations

    Racial & Identity Profiling Advisory Board Annual Report 2019

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    California\u27s Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015 (RIPA) is truly groundbreaking legislation - the first of its kind and scale in the United States. This law requires nearly all California law enforcement agencies to collect, maintain, and analyze demographic data on all detentions and searches, thereby codifying the recommendation of the President\u27s Task Force on 21st Century Policing which aimed to improve understanding and create evidence based policies through this data collection. The Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory Board (Board) was created by the Act to shepherd this data collection and provide public reports with the ultimate objective to eliminate racial and identity profiling and improve and understand diversity in law enforcement through training, education, and outreach. The Board\u27s mission is enhanced by the diverse perspectives and backgrounds of its 19 members, as well as by the vibrant discourse brought to board meetings and subcommittees by members of the public and the law enforcement community. Together, the Board and stakeholders share the goals of increasing public safety, improving law enforcement-community relations, and bolstering trust through collaboration, transparency, and accountability. In its second annual report, the Board has built on the foundation established by its inaugural report released January 1, 2018. Specifically, this report aims to enhance the transparency of the stop data collection process by providing the public with detailed information on how the data is collected and submitted and how the Department and law enforcement agencies ensure the integrity of this data. This report also provides recommendations that can be incorporated by law enforcement agencies to enhance their policies, procedures, and trainings on topics that intersect with bias and racial and identity profiling

    Sacred Heart University Chapel: Celebrating 10 Years, 2009-2019

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    The 10th Anniversary 2019 Edition. The Chapel of the Holy Spirit was dedicated on September 27, 2009

    Racial & Identity Profiling Advisory Board Annual Report 2018

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    The Racial and Identity Profiling Advisory (RIPA) Board began its work in July 2016 as part of the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015 (AB 953) with a momentous purpose: to eliminate racial and identity profiling and improve racial and identity sensitivity in law enforcement.1 In order to achieve these goals, the RIPA Board was charged with several responsibilities including publishing an annual report on the past and current status of racial and identity profiling with policy recommendations for eliminating it. This is the first report of the RIPA Board, and similarly represents California’s first ever statewide report on racial and identity profiling in law enforcement. In addition to forming the RIPA Board, the Racial and Identity Profiling Act also requires that in the coming years the majority of California’s law enforcement agencies collect information on all “stops” – defined as any detention or search (including consensual searches) – and report this information to the California Department of Justice (Department). Starting in January 2020, the RIPA Board’s annual report will contain analyses of the “stop” data reported to the Department, beginning with California’s largest law enforcement agencies that will start collecting this data in July 2018 and report it to the Department by April 2019

    Mission and Catholic Identity [Booklet]

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    ‌The Office of Mission and Catholic Identity at Sacred Heart University has as its primary purpose the articulation, promotion and transmission of the Catholic Intellectual and Spiritual Tradition

    Using an identity lens : constructive working with children in the criminal justice system

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    Research has shown that identity, and how you feel about yourself, can be key to moving forward with life and away from crime. Working with the University of Salford, Youth Offending Teams and supported by the Barrow Cadbury Trust, this resource has been developed to promote a constructive, identity-focused approach to ultimately help divert children away from progressing further through the criminal justice system. Using the principles of the Nacro-led Beyond Youth Custody programme, this toolkit outlines how these can be applied to working with children before custody to support them towards positive outcomes and prevent further offending
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