417 research outputs found

    Using a Poster and Survey Model to Reach New Heights at Library Orientation

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    Background : Although active learning techniques have the potential to enhance the learner’s experience, it can be difficult to efficiently and effectively incorporate them into unstructured events outside of the classroom such as an orientation fair. This presentation will show how we took a successful poster and survey activity used by academic medical librarians at a community career fair and then adapted it for graduate medical education orientation fairs. We designed a simple poster along with a short survey to help us actively connect with small groups of new medical residents while introducing them to library resources and services. Description : Since 2011, librarians have participated at an annual community career fair. Despite being creative with themes at the fair, our exhibit was largely overlooked by disinterested students due to its lecture-based format until its redesign as an active learning poster and a short survey activity. The poster’s information and graphics did all the “talking” while students were asked to “help” the librarians by reading and critiquing the poster information using a short survey. The success of the poster and survey in the community encouraged us to try the same model with new medical residents at their orientation fair. The redesign prompted more questions and interesting conversations among residents and librarians than in the past. Preliminary review of three years of survey data has revealed an 80% survey completion rate with 100% satisfaction with the poster as an active learning tool. Conclusion : Survey results suggest that the poster and survey model resulted in students retaining more information about the library resources and services while expressing greater satisfaction with this teaching format. Dana Medical librarians continue to use this active learning activity, to study its results, and to build on its success with other library presentations

    Barriers and Facilitators to Use of a Clinical Evidence Technology for Management of Skin Problems in Primary Care: Insights from Mixed Methods

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    Background: A previous cluster-randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a clinical evidence technology (CET), VisualDx, for skin problems seen by Primary Care Providers (PCPs). Based on patient report, there was no effect on time to problem resolution or return appointments. Objective: To explain, from the provider perspective, why the CET did not make a difference in the clinical trial and to identify barriers and facilitators to use. Methods: Mixed methods study design. Providers from both arms completed a survey about their use of VisualDx and information-seeking during and after the trial. Active arm providers participated in interviews to explore their opinions and experiences using VisualDx. Behavioral steps of the evidence-based medicine (EBM) paradigm informed the 6 step model. Results: PCPs found VisualDx easy to use (median 3 on a 1-4 scale), but found it only somewhat useful (median 2 on a 1-4 scale). PCPs with fewer years in practice used it more often and found it easier to use. Interviews identified facilitators and barriers to using VisualDx. Facilitators included diagnostic uncertainty, positive attitude, easy access, utility for diagnosis and therapy decisions, and utility for patient communication. Barriers included confidence in dermatology, preference for other sources, interface difficulty, and retrieval of irrelevant diagnoses and images. Some PCPs reported positive impacts on patient treatment and fewer referrals; others saw no difference. PCPs found VisualDx easy to access, but some found the interface difficult to use. They found it useful and relevant at times, but also frustrating and time-consuming. They used other sources in addition to, or instead of, VisualDx. Conclusion: PCPs did not perceive VisualDx as “useful” often enough for them to use it frequently or exclusively, thereby reducing the likelihood of its making a difference in patient-level outcomes such as problem resolution and return appointments

    Small But Mighty: Letters-to-the-Editor Published on the Zika Virus, 1952 - 2018

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    Objective: To conduct a bibliometric analysis of Letters-to-the-Editor published on the Zika Virus between 1952 and 2018. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted on the terms (Zika OR ZIKV). Results were limited to Publication Date = 1952-2018, and Publication Type = Letter. Results were exported to EndNote, and the full-text (PDF) of each Letter was examined. Non-Letters, duplicates, irrelevant results, and incorrectly indexed items were excluded. Letters discovered serendipitously were added. The total number of Letters published and their date distribution was determined. The Letters were categorized as Reader Response, Author Reply, Observation, Case Report, or Research. Additional parameters included the number of authors, number of references, use of graphics, and funding. Results: Between 1952 and 2018, 499 Letters-to-the-Editor about the Zika Virus were published, with the majority being published in 2016 or later. These were categorized as 29.9% Reader Responses, 11.2% Author Replies, 22.4% Observations, 14.0% Case Reports, and 22.4% Research. The Letters were written by 1-35 authors, and included 0-63 references. Over 38% of Letters contained graphics, and 15% reported funding support. An interesting anomaly were the 104 letters authored or co-authored by one particular individual, which constituted 20.8% of the total. Conclusion: Contrary to conventional wisdom, this study has shown that Letters-to-the-Editor are often much more than simply reader responses to a published article, and may serve as a source of clinical or research information. However, this study also demonstrates that the characteristics of this publication type may make it susceptible to various anomalies

    Implementing the information prescription protocol in a family medicine practice: a case study.

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    QUESTION: Can an information prescription protocol be successfully integrated into a family medicine practice seeking to enhance patient education and self-management? SETTING: Milton Family Practice, an outpatient clinic and resident teaching site of the University of Vermont and Fletcher Allen Health Care, is located in a semirural area fifteen miles from main campus. OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to increase physicians\u27 knowledge and use of information prescriptions, sustain integration of information prescription use, and increase physicians\u27 ability to provide patient education information. METHODS: Methods used were promotion of the National Library of Medicine\u27s Information Rx, physician instruction, installation of patient and provider workstations, and a collaborative approach to practice integration. MAIN RESULTS: A post-intervention survey showed increased physician knowledge and use of the Information Rx protocol. Support procedures were integrated at the practice. CONCLUSIONS: Sustainable integration of Information Rx in a primary care clinic requires not only promotion and education, but also attention to clinic organization and procedures

    2019 System Library Services Visual Annual Report

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    A visual report of the 2019 activities and accomplishments by System Library Services at Providence St. Joseph Healt

    Beyond the Buy-in: One Year after Building an Institutional Repository

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    Background: In 2018 Providence St. Joseph Health launched an institutional repository to showcase research in a global and consumable way. Year one comprised of establishing the repository, gathering materials, and promoting services to administrators, clinical, and research staff. Year two built on the momentum of the initial buy-in, focusing on growing submissions, incorporating special collections, and detailed marketing outreach utilizing altmetrics. Description: In year one, the Digital Asset Librarian conducted outreach to major research groups and departments within the organization. Coupled with the utilization of advanced search algorithms, outreach yielded monthly article and presentation submissions to the institutional repository. Submissions from outreach and search algorithms maintained consistent monthly growth of materials. Following the success of year one outreach initiatives, year two focused on maintaining materials growth and utilized altmetrics usage and interaction statistics as a visual marketing strategy. User interaction increased 277% from year one, growing engagement from 3,656 individual metadata page hits to 10,147. Altmetrics tools reflected a similar spike in usage, with social media engagement escalating from 12,335 interactions to 42,105 interactions. Initial outreach for year two altmetrics marketing was well received. Researchers and administrator feedback noted appreciation towards seeing the whole impact of publications. Conclusion: Evidenced by continued usage and positive reception, the institutional repository creates an investment between user, author, and institution. The institutional repository usage remains global and dynamic, reaching 111 countries in 2019, averaging a 300% increase in engagement between usage and readership. Additionally, marketing altmetrics as a visual piece of the growing engagement has helped create a well-rounded picture of organizational scholarly materials. Future and continued outreach will be necessary to maintain buy-in between the authors and library staff managing the repository

    Evidence in the Literature: Efficiently Searching the Collective Knowledge

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    Search effectively. Search efficiently. Find the evidence you need as a healthcare professional to provide the best care to patients. This session will include timesaving tips and tricks to identify and access relevant literature for the decision-making process. A healthcare provider must focus on integrating appropriate evidence with expert knowledge and patient needs; a librarian can help healthcare providers cut through the static and find the best resources. Join this session to discuss the most useful types of literature, pertinent research databases, effective search strategies, and methods for getting your hands on the resources you need

    Online Information in the Health Sciences

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    Features information retrieval system for health sciences. BRS information retrieval system; Full text biomedical databases; BIOSIS Information Transfer System

    Elevating Librarian-Mediated Search Services: When 2nd Best Isn\u27t Good Enough

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    Objective: To optimize librarian-mediated search services, librarians must consider all aspects of their search service that affect service utilization and efficacy. The library literature provides little information concerning the format in which libraries are providing literature search results and even less on the effect of format on search service utilization.  At our academic health science library, the number of search requests received rose dramatically after we began providing results in RefShare format. RefShare is the collaboration tool available in ProQuest’s RefWorks®.  We wanted to know how other libraries were providing results and whether they had seen format affect search service utilization. Methods: A survey created using Springshare’s LibWizard® was distributed to the MEDLIB-L listserv, the expertsearching listserv, and through direct email to AAHSL reference and education librarians. The survey was sent out on March 31st, 2019 and closed on April 30th, 2019. We asked about the audience that the librarian/library served and requested basic information about the librarian-mediated search services offered -- with a special focus on formats used to send literature search results to the requester. Results and Conclusion: We have analyzed the survey results, and we share our findings here

    The Accidental Academic Library: Meeting the Needs of a Health System–Affiliated University

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    Background: In 2017 a small liberal arts college affiliated with a large western health system was re-branded, and a School of Health Professions was created to prepare for future staffing shortages and to train the next generation of healthcare workers. Instead of relying solely upon its own library, University administration reached out to the health system library to meet the information needs of this new group of students, most of whom were active employees of the healthcare enterprise. Thus, a group of hospital librarians found themselves as accidental academic librarians.Description: Library leadership researched academic library bench-marking to propose a budget for collections and FTE. Library staff brushed up on library trends and copyright issues specific to academic libraries and prepared to serve a new type of user. Vendor negotiations became newly complex as they brought in both the corporate and academic sides of the business and raised the issue of how to properly license for the University. Operational challenges included subscription IP overlaps and how to provide remote access to non-employed students and faculty. Librarians had to adjust to the different service level needs for students as compared to employees, many of whom were one and the same.Conclusion: Nearly 3 years later and the health system library has yet to receive any additional funding or FTE to support the University and has built the collection and services on its existing budget. Publisher contracts are revisited on an annual basis as the growth of the school of health professions puts pressure on agreed-upon pricing models, as well as library staffing capacity. Library staff has adapted instructional materials and service expectations to the student population, shifting the balance from a value-add fish FOR a person to a TEACH to fish approach
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