4,550 research outputs found

    Growth vs. Fixed Mindsets in College Mathematics Education

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    The purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship between college mathematics professors and whether they have a growth or fixed mindset towards the students in their classrooms. This paper will share the results from a survey that was constructed with 38 participants - all of which are college mathematics professors in the state of Ohio. This survey focused on asking questions that would relate the professors to either having growth or fixed mindset traits. The survey also asked for the demographics of the participants, which helped classify similarities between those with growth or fixed mindset ideals. After analyzing the survey results and the demographics, the results show those with fixed mindset ideals are more likely to be 51 years old or older and those with growth mindset ideals are more likely to be 50 years old or younger. This draws a very generalized correlation between the age of college mathematics professors and their mindset towards the students in their classrooms

    Implementing Growth Mindset In Migrant Students

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    Nowadays, migrant students may lack academic motivation due to their fixed mindset. With that fixed mindset, they may think that, because of their migrant status, they cannot cannot achieve and excel like others.They may benefit from increasing their motivation by having a growth mindset . Therefore, I created a three-day lesson on growth mindset for first grade migrant students at Ann Soldo Elementary School in Watsonville, California

    Growth Mindset Training and the Effect of Math-Gender Stereotype Threat on Girl Students

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    To investigate whether growth mindset training can weaken the effect of math-gender stereotype threat on girl students, this study undertook experimental intervention in a group of grade-11 girl students and found that: (i) Mindsets can moderate the effect of math-gender stereotype threat. Girls with a growth mindset are less likely to be affected by math-gender stereotype threat compared with those with a fixed mindset. (ii) Growth mindset training for girls with a fixed mindset can effectively reduce the effect of math-gender stereotype threat on their math performance

    Encouraging a Growth Mindset in Engineering Students

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    A person’s “mindset” guides a great deal of how one approaches life -- and especially how students approach education. While someone with a fixed mindset believes that their intelligence is fixed and unchangeable, someone with a growth mindset believes that their intelligence is changeable and can grow as they learn more. Most people’s mindset lies along a spectrum with these two extremes at either end. In addition to other outcomes, the mindset that a person has determines how they interpret mistakes they make; whereas someone with a fixed mindset thinks mistakes result from their innate lack of ability, someone with a growth mindset views mistakes as opportunities to learn more. It is no secret that students think that some classes are easy and that others are hard. Thermodynamics of Materials (MSE 308) falls into the latter category. Students have heard that the class is difficult and that the time commitment is high; many have also heard that the professor is supportive and is interested in helping students learn. With a fixed mindset, students may be at a disadvantage coming into a class that they think is going to be especially difficult because they don’t believe their hard work will help them succeed. In contrast, students with a growth mindset might appreciate the learning opportunities that a well-structured but difficult class offers. The research questions we addressed were: (1) Will students’ attitudes about their own abilities in what are perceived to be difficult classes change? and (2) Will those students with a more fixed mindset adopt more of a growth mindset? Students’ mindsets were determined using a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the semester. This also asked about their perception of difficult classes. Throughout the semester, we talked about brain-based learning and adopting a growth mindset; students also reflected on the learning process. Anecdotal evidence suggests that students learned a lot about the growth mindset and were able to apply it more in MSE 308, although the numerical data suggests that a stronger intervention is needed to enable students to shift from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. One outcome of the work is that students’ mindsets were already either in the category of “strong growth mindset” or “growth mindset with some fixed ideas” at the beginning of the semester. While almost half of the students ended up with a stronger growth mindset, some moved more toward a fixed mindset; the explanation for this is a target for future study. Learning about the growth mindset did seem to reinforce the beliefs that many students held about their approaches to learning and difficult courses

    JAPANESE STUDENTS’ MINDSET AND MOTIVATION IN STUDYING ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND READING

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    This study probes the intrinsic and extrinsic types of the motivation of Japanese University students and sheds light on their mindset and beliefs about learning English Grammar and Reading. During 2016, a survey was administered to 260 students at a University in Tohoku, Japan. The findings revealed that 73% of participan0ts tended to have a fixed mindset with a slight degree of growth mindset while 19% tended to favor a growth mindset with some degree of fixed mindset, 6% with a strong fixed mindset and 2% with a strong growth mindset. This suggests that these students need to be motivated to be more pro-failure and accepting of mistakes to succeed in learning English. During this research, the author also taught with the support of the Family Environment Mode Approach (FEMA) (Ocampo, 2015). The study confirmed that the FEMA approach promoted a feeling of relaxation in at least half the participants during classroom activities, despite the pressures they were facing due to Test of English for International Communication(TOEIC) examination preparation. 98% of these students were also found to be extrinsically motivated in learning English grammar and reading, as they were included in their curriculum.&nbsp

    Mindset and its relationship to anxiety in clinical veterinary students

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    This study investigated anxiety, one aspect of mental wellbeing, in fourth year veterinary students before the final clinical section of their course (intramural rotations (IMR)). It explored the relationship between reported anxiety and ‘mindset’: an individual’s view on the ability to develop (eg, improve intelligence). Questionnaires were completed by 130 students. Students were mindset typed for ability and personality and rated their anxiety towards IMR. Students with different overall mindsets (‘strong growth’, ‘growth’ and ‘fixed’) were invited to participate in focus groups, to discuss causes of their anxieties. Quantitative results indicated 63.1 per cent of students had strong growth or growth mindsets overall, and that females were more fixed mindset-oriented than males. Females reported significantly greater anxiety than males. A fixed mindset view overall, and of ability, were significantly correlated with increased anxiety, while mindset view of personality was not. Students provided various reasons for their anxieties, which differed with mindset. Fixed mindset students (n=2) focused on concerns about knowledge, whereas growth students (n=6) were also anxious about work-life balance and future work. Growth students saw clinicians as future colleagues, rather than intimidating teachers. Students reported an awareness of being graded, although growth students were aware that IMR are learning opportunities

    The Growth Mindset in Nursing Education

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    Introduction: The growth mindset model has been linked with academic success in disciplines outside of nursing. Growth mindset learners are more likely to believe that intelligence is malleable, remain engaged in learning, persist through challenges, remediate, and have greater academic success. This study examined whether growth mindset nursing students were more engaged in their curriculum, were more persistent (gritty), and their perceptions of belonging in nursing school as opposed to fixed mindset peers. Methods: 102 students from a national database responded to a web-based survey. Results suggested that growth mindset learners were grittier and expressed higher levels of belonging than their fixed mindset colleagues. Implications include a need to consider the integration of the growth mindset model into nursing education

    An Instrumental Case Study: Growth Mindset Instructional Best Practices for Learning Disabled Students

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    The problem that drove this study was that students who struggle in school, especially those with a non-intelligence-based learning disability, suffer from a fixed mindset after years of feelings of failure in school. This mindset causes them to develop maladaptive approaches to learning that inhibit success. The purpose of this study was to describe the best practices of reading teachers who have a reputation for high student achievement and who adhere to a growth mindset in an effort to build a growth mindset culture with their students. This qualitative instrumental case study was conducted through interviews of eleven reading teachers/specialists from both elementary and secondary education. The findings indicated that students who have a fixed mindset of learning due to a learning disability often demonstrate maladaptive approaches to learning that include shutting down, avoidance behaviors, and acting out behaviors. The findings revealed several strategies that can effectively help these struggling students move from a fixed mindset to more of a growth mindset. These strategies included creating a safe and trustful class environment, creating success experiences for students, and teaching brain science and mindset theory. Finally, the findings revealed obstacles that teachers face in their work to move these students to a growth mindset to improve their achievement and the practices they use to overcome those obstacles

    Identification and Assessment of Fixed versus Growth Mindsets in Human and Anatomy Physiology Undergraduate Students

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    Fixed mindsets and growth mindsets are present in individual’s attitudes, affecting their motivations to complete responsibilities or overcome challenges. In this study, we aim to identify and assess the mindsets of undergraduate students partaking in the Human Anatomy and Physiology (HAP) undergraduate course at the University of Mississippi, the gateway course being well-known for its difficulty and being described as “daunting” to many allied-health majors. By utilizing Carol Dweck’s growth mindset model, we are interested in determining whether students possess a “fixed” mindset versus a “growth” mindset, in conjunction to assessing their classroom performance correlating with that demonstrated mindset. An individual with a “fixed” mindset views their ability as innate and is invaluable to improve if not predisposed to the said ability, whereas an individual with a “growth” mindset views their ability may be enhanced through efforts in improvement. There were significant relationships observed between students’ survey responses that demonstrated a fixed mindset with weaker academic performance as evident by lower course performance scores when compared to demonstration of a growth mindset with higher course performance scores. Students also self-evaluated their capability to succeed in the course and their current performance in the course, and a significant relationship was observed between weaker self-evaluation and lower performance, while stronger self-evaluation corresponded to higher performance
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