1,779 research outputs found

    On the Evolution and Inheritance of Farming Culture in Southwest Ethnic Minority Areas

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    Farming culture in southwest ethnic minority area is an important part of the whole Chinese farming culture. The unique natural conditions, ethnic structure and production features in southwest ethnic minority area have bred a special value of farming culture, making it play a significant role in protecting the environment and promoting ethnic harmony and regional development. Modernization has dramatically changed the environment for the evolution of farming culture. We must concise and develop the core concept and based on protection and inheritance to reasonably develop and utilize it to realize its value and promote its development

    Influence of Farming Culture on Rituals of North Malabar Region of Kerala State

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    This paper forms a part of the theses entitled “Influence of farming culture on the folk arts and rituals of North Malabar region of Kerala state”. The objective of the study was to identify specific elements as influenced by farming culture and to assess their scientific rationale, if any. The research design followed was exploratory and ex post facto in nature. The study revealed that most of the rituals have been originated from an ancient agrarian society which had a deep-rooted stand in farming culture. It was also seen that these rituals, through superstitions, taboos, etc., prompted the public to conserve the ecosystem. They promoted eco-friendly sustainable farming supplementing the endeavor towards a greener Kerala

    Our Common Country: Family Farming, Culture, and Community in the Nineteenth-Century Midwest

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    Review of: Our Common Country: Family Farming, Culture, and Community in the Nineteenth-Century Midwest. Rugh, Susan Sessions

    Our Common Country: Family Farming, Culture, and Community in the Nineteenth-Century Midwest

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    Review of: Our Common Country: Family Farming, Culture, and Community in the Nineteenth-Century Midwest. Rugh, Susan Sessions

    First evidence for interpersonal violence in Ukraine's Trypillian farming culture : Individual 3 from Verteba Cave, Bilche Zolote

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    This paper presents the initial stages of an interdisciplinary study of human skeletal remains interred at Verteba Cave, western Ukraine. This site has been described previously as a “ritual site of the Trypillian culture complex” by Nikitin et al. in Comprehensive site chronology and ancient mitochondrial DNA analysis from Verteba Cave – a Trypillian culture site of Eneolithic Ukraine, Interdisciplinaria Archaeologica: Natural Sciences in Archaeology 1, 9–18., and the material considered here is one of seven crania recovered during excavations at Verteba between 2008 and 2010. Palaeopathological analysis of the individual considered here indicates that this is a young adult female with evidence for peri-mortem injury, cranial surgery and into early stage Trypillia culture inter-personal interactions and burial ritual in this region of Ukraine. Paper published in Proceedings of the British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology 13th and 14th Annual Conferences in Edinburgh (2nd-4th September 2011) and Bournemouth (14th–16th September 2012)

    The ABCs of ATVs: Factors implicated in child deaths and injuries involving all terrain vehicles on New Zealand farms

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    The agricultural sector features prominently in the rates of ATV injuries and fatalities amongst children in New Zealand. This research project assesses the nature and scope of ATV accidents to children on New Zealand farms and provides recommendations that attempt to meet the needs of all relevant stakeholders. In particular, we believe that the most effective means of reducing the rates of ATV injuries and fatalities amongst children involves a strategy which recognises the unique circumstances which give rise to practical impediments to safer farm workplace practices. We identified three distinct groups of children in the literature, each facing a different major risk category. Very young children were most at risk as passengers. As age increased the highest risks applied to bystanders, while older children and teenagers were more likely to be injured as drivers. The high risks to younger children as passengers and bystanders were indicative of underlying problems associated with childcare options – or, more particularly, the lack of childcare options. Accidents involving older children were associated more closely with practices around child supervision and involved aspects of farming culture, rather than practical barriers to safer practices

    Dams for Towns; The Stagnation of Farming Culture around the Pepacton Reservoir

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    New York City\u27s water supply system is among the most extensive municipal water systems in the world. It serves over 8 million people daily and holds about 580 billion gallons (The City of New York 2010). The Pepacton Reservoir, built in 1955, is the largest reservoir in the system and supplies almost 25% of the total drinking water in New York City. During its construction, 943 people were forced to move from their homes in the towns of Arena, Pepacton, Shavertown, and Union Grove. These small, rural farming communities disappeared, reflecting a general trend within United States agriculture during the 1900s. The goal of this project is to represent spatially these changes in agricultural during the 1900s for Delaware County. The analysis is based on historical census data available from the U.S. Census Bureau in shapefile format and statistical, agricultural data from Delaware County and the U.S. Census of Agriculture, which is not yet georeferenced. Joins of nonspatial data from census to spatial data layers from the Seamless Server form a major component of the analysis, along with georeferencing maps available from Delaware County of the towns and farm

    Wise exploitation – a game with a higher productivity than cooperation – transforms biological productivity into economic productivity.

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    I suggest a new game called wise exploitation. It is characterized by a small investment of the exploiting party to either breed the exploited party or educate the exploited party not to detect exploitation. Thereby a higher productivity than cooperation or prisonersÂŽ dilemma is achieved. The higher productivity is a benefit for the group and one party on the cost of the other. To stabilize this an important marginal condition has to be met: the investment (breeding, education) must be overcompensated by the gain. In the light of this suggestion mutualism or symbiotic associations of genetically non related organisms, like leafcutter ants with their fungus or human groups should be reinvestigated.wise exploitation; productive exploitation; consumptive exploitation; avoided exploitation; prisonersÂŽ dilemma; tolerated exploitation; costing exploitation; cost efficient exploitation; breeding; farming; culture; civilization; education; hope; suffering; gain; cost; loss; mass and energy conservation; leafcutter ants; fix cost; variable cost; production function; enzyme kinetics; Michalelis Menten; saturation curve; productivity; forced exploitation; forced mutualism; substrate; brute force; fear; honesty; signaling; cooperation; Nash equilibrium; mutation; invade; reward; stability; predator; prey; self sustaining; emotions; arms race;
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