134,734 research outputs found

    Objects as Expression of Power, Religion and Therapy: The “Country” Pots in the Bamenda Grassfields Fondoms of Cameroon

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    In most parts of the world especially in Africa, people can be identified and distinguished through objects. These objects which some are worn on the body or carried along are decorated with symbols which could be decoded by those who comprehend their cultural connotations. The object this article focuses on is the indigenous or ‘country’ pots of the Bamenda Grassfields, pots which were used in the past by women in the kitchen, by traditional medical doctors and by traditional leaders; notables and heads of secret societies. Today, these country pots are not very visible in the kitchen as it was the case before because of the introduction of other containers. The questions raised by this paper are: What is the place of the country pot in the lives of the Bamenda Grassfields people? What is the symbolism of the motifs represented on the Bamenda Grassfields country pots? What are the change currently taking place in the production and use of these pots? The objectives of the article are to examine the roles and find out the meanings of the motifs represented on pots. It also explores the changes which are taking place in the production, commercialisation and use of the country pots. Data for this article was collected using the qualitative method and this data was analysed using content analysis and interpreted soon after collection was over. The interpretation was done with the theories of cultural ecology of Steward, functionalism of Radcliff-Brown and Malinowski, symbolic anthropology of Geertz and cultural evolution of Tylor and Morgan. Findings reveal that the country pots are an aspect of material culture of the Bamenda Grassfields. They are of very great cultural value and play a fundamental role in these cultures; they are an expression of power, religion, healing as well as communion. The country pots like any other cultural element, if they are valorised, they will continue to identify the people from generation to generation

    What works for offenders and staff: Comparing two multi-agency approaches to offender resettlement

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    Between 2005 and 2007, the Kent and Medway Resettlement Programme (KMRP) piloted EXODUS (ex-offenders discharged under supervision), a multi-agency support system for identified prolific and priority offenders (IPPOs). Unlike traditional models of multi-agency support, EXODUS agencies work from the same location to maximize support for IPPOs, and inter- and intra-agency support for staff. This study assessed the perceived effectiveness of EXODUS. EXODUS staff and IPPOs were interviewed and their responses compared to those of traditional multi-agency support staff and IPPOs. Analysis showed that EXODUS IPPOs had committed fewer offences since receiving support than did comparison IPPOs. Neither group was more likely to be employed, but of those who were, EXODUS IPPOs were more likely to remain employed than comparison IPPOs. Most, regardless of type of support structure, recommended their programme and staff, although EXODUS IPPOs were more satisfied with the support they received. Staff believed that an expansion of the multi-agency approach was needed and that agency roles should be more clearly defined. EXODUS staff expressed higher efficacy in their own and colleagues’ ability to provide effective support and improved inter-agency relations and support from co-workers. However, EXODUS and comparison staff did not differ in levels of job satisfaction

    Exodus/New Jersey Records, (1964-1971)

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    EXODUS: Integrating intelligent systems for launch operations support

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    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing knowledge-based systems to automate critical operations functions for the space shuttle fleet. Intelligent systems will monitor vehicle and ground support subsystems for anomalies, assist in isolating and managing faults, and plan and schedule shuttle operations activities. These applications are being developed independently of one another, using different representation schemes, reasoning and control models, and hardware platforms. KSC has recently initiated the EXODUS project to integrate these stand alone applications into a unified, coordinated intelligent operations support system. EXODUS will be constructed using SOCIAL, a tool for developing distributed intelligent systems. EXODUS, SOCIAL, and initial prototyping efforts using SOCIAL to integrate and coordinate selected EXODUS applications are described

    Five Strong Women Charged with

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    Exodus

    To Dance Again

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    Exodus 15:1-11,20-21

    Thousand to one

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    Exodus 20:1-1

    Project Exodus

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    A design for a manned Mars mission, PROJECT EXODUS is presented. PROJECT EXODUS incorporates the design of a hypersonic waverider, cargo ship and NIMF (nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel) shuttle lander to safely carry out a three to five month mission on the surface of Mars. The cargo ship transports return fuel, return engine, surface life support, NIMF shuttle, and the Mars base to low Mars orbit (LMO). The cargo ship is powered by a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system which allows the cargo ship to execute a spiral trajectory to Mars. The waverider transports ten astronauts to Mars and back. It is launched from the Space Station with propulsion provided by a chemical engine and a delta velocity of 9 km/sec. The waverider performs an aero-gravity assist maneuver through the atmosphere of Venus to obtain a deflection angle and increase in delta velocity. Once the waverider and cargo ship have docked the astronauts will detach the landing cargo capsules and nuclear electric power plant and remotely pilot them to the surface. They will then descend to the surface aboard the NIMF shuttle. A dome base will be quickly constructed on the surface and the astronauts will conduct an exploratory mission for three to five months. They will return to Earth and dock with the Space Station using the waverider

    Joseph, Jehoiachin, and Cyrus: On Book Endings, Exoduses and Exiles, and Yehudite/Judean Social Remembering

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    In a recent ZAW article, Michael Chan argues that II Reg 25,27-30 alludes to Gen 40-41, and that this allusion provides a hermeneutical key for understanding the purpose of II Reg 25,27-30 in an Enneateuchal context: it points to an imminent exodus, a return from exile and a gathering of diaspora in the promised land. This article picks up where Chan left off, in order to flesh out some of the implications of his contribution. It argues that remembering exodus at the end of II Reg included hope, as Chan says, but also struggles and failure, punishment and death. Exodus is multivocal. Likewise, the end of II Reg contributes to a multivocal discourse concerning Davidic kingship, which included the end of Chronicles and prophetic literature. The diminution of Davidic kingship in II Reg 25,27-30 is balanced by other perspectives. The article concludes with an observation on the import of this multivocality for Yehudite social memory

    Exodus and Work

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    Introduction to Exodus Israel in Egypt (Exodus 1:1–13:16) The Harshness of the Israelites’ Slave Labor in Egypt (Exodus 1:8-14) The Work of Midwifery and Mothering (Exodus 1:15-2:10) God’s Call to Moses (Exodus 2:11-3:22) God’s Work of Redemption for Israel (Exodus 5:1-6:28) Moses and Aaron Announce God’s Judgment to Pharaoh (Exodus 7:1-12:51) Israel at the Red Sea and on the Way to Sinai (Exodus 13:17-18:27) The Work of Justice Among the People of Israel (Exodus 18:1-27) Israel at Mount Sinai (Exodus 19:1-40:38) The Meaning of Law in Exodus (Exodus 19:1-24:18) The Role of the Law for Christians (Exodus 20:1-24:18) Instructions about Work (Exodus 20:1-17 and 21:1-23:9) The Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1-17) “You shall have no other gods before me” (Exodus 20:3) “You shall not make for yourself an idol” (Exodus 20:4) “You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the LORD your God” (Exodus 20:7) Remember the sabbath day and keep it holy. Six days you shall labor (Exodus 20:8-11) Honor your father and your mother” (Exodus 20:12) “You shall not murder” (Exodus 20:13) “You shall not commit adultery” (Exodus 20:14) “You shall not steal” (Exodus 20:15) “You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor” (Exodus 20:16) “You shall not covet … anything that belongs to your neighbor” (Exodus 20:17) Case laws in the Book of the Covenant (Exodus 21:1-23:33) Slavery or indentured servitude (Exodus 21:1-11) Commercial restitution (Exodus 21:18-22:15) Productive opportunities for the poor (Exodus 22:21-27 & 23:10-11) Lending and collateral (Exodus 22:25-27) The Tabernacle (Exodus 25:1-40:38) Conclusions from the Book of Exodu
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