422 research outputs found

    Underascertainment of radiotherapy receipt in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data

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    BACKGROUND: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry data have been used to suggest underuse and disparities in receipt of radiotherapy. Prior studies have cautioned that SEER may underascertain radiotherapy but lacked adequate representation to assess whether underascertainment varies by geography or patient sociodemographic characteristics. The authors sought to determine rates and correlates of underascertainment of radiotherapy in recent SEER data. METHODS: The authors evaluated data from 2290 survey respondents with nonmetastatic breast cancer, aged 20 to 79 years, diagnosed from June of 2005 to February 2007 in Detroit and Los Angeles and reported to SEER registries (73% response rate). Survey responses regarding treatment and sociodemographic factors were merged with SEER data. The authors compared radiotherapy receipt as reported by patients versus SEER records. The authors then assessed correlates of radiotherapy underascertainment in SEER. RESULTS: Of 1292 patients who reported receiving radiotherapy, 273 were coded as not receiving radiotherapy in SEER (underascertained). Underascertainment was more common in Los Angeles than in Detroit (32.0% vs 11.25%, P < .001). On multivariate analysis, radiotherapy underascertainment was significantly associated in each registry (Los Angeles, Detroit) with stage ( P = .008, P = .026), income ( P < .001, P = .050), mastectomy receipt ( P < .001, P < .001), chemotherapy receipt ( P < .001, P = .045), and diagnosis at a hospital that was not accredited by the American College of Surgeons ( P < .001, P < .001). In Los Angeles, additional significant variables included younger age ( P < .001), nonprivate insurance ( P < .001), and delayed receipt of radiotherapy ( P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: SEER registry data as currently collected may not be an appropriate source for documentation of rates of radiotherapy receipt or investigation of geographic variation in the radiation treatment of breast cancer. Cancer 2011;. © 2011 American Cancer Society. This study found that the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program, among the largest Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries, coded that radiation was not received in nearly a third of cases in which breast cancer patients themselves reported radiation receipt, whereas ascertainment of radiation receipt was much more complete in another large SEER registry, that of the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System. SEER registry data as currently collected may not be an appropriate source for documentation of rates of radiotherapy receipt or geographic disparities.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/90319/1/26295_ftp.pd

    The role of chemotherapy in the management of olfactory neuroblastoma: A 40-year surveillance, epidemiology, and end results registry study

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    Background: In this retrospective surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry analysis, we investigated the role of chemotherapy (CT) in the treatment of olfactory neuroblastoma (ON), an exceedingly rare sino-nasal tumor typically treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy (RT). Methods: We analyzed all patients in the SEER registry diagnosed with a single primary malignancy of ON, a primary tumor site within the nasal cavity or surrounding sinuses, sufficient staging information to derive Kadish staging, and \u3e0 days of survival, ensuring follow-up data. Receipt of CT in the SEER registry was documented as either Yes or No/Unknown. Results: Six hundred and thirty-six patients were identified. One hundred and ninety-five patients received CT as part of their treatment for ON. Following propensity score matching and inverse probability of treatment weighting, there was inferior overall survival (OS) (HR 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.2, P = .001) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.4, P \u3c .001) for patients who received CT compared to those who were not treated with CT or had unknown CT status. On subgroup analysis, the only patient population that derived benefit from CT were patients who did not receive surgery and were treated with CT and/or RT (HR 0.3, 95% CI: 0.14-0.61, P \u3c .001). Conclusions: Based on this retrospective SEER registry analysis, the use of CT in the management of ON is associated with decreased OS. Our analysis suggests that patients who are considered nonsurgical candidates may benefit from the addition of CT

    Adjuvant Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Invasive Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: an Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry

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    Background: Management and outcomes of patients with invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the pancreas are not well established. We investigated whether adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) improved cancer-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) among patients undergoing surgical resection for invasive IPMN. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry was used in this retrospective cohort study. All adult patients with resection of invasive IPMN from 1988 to 2007 were included. CSS and OS were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. Unadjusted and propensity-score-adjusted Cox proportional-hazards modeling were used for subgroup analyses. Results: 972 patients were included. Adjuvant RT was administered to 31.8% (n=309) of patients. There was no difference in overall median CSS or OS in patients who received adjuvant RT (5-year CSS: 26.5months; 5-year OS: 23.5months) versus those who did not (CSS: 28.5months, P=0.17; OS: 23.5months, P=0.23). Univariate predictors of survival were lymph node (LN) involvement, T4-classified tumors, and poorly differentiated tumor grade (all P<0.05). In the propensity-score-adjusted analysis, adjuvant RT was associated with improved 5-year CSS [hazard ratio (HR): 0.67, P=0.004] and 5-year OS (HR: 0.73, P=0.014) among all patients with LN involvement, though further analysis by T-classification demonstrated no survival differences among patients with T1/T2 disease; patients with T3/T4-classified tumors had improved CSS (HR: 0.71, P=0.022) but no difference in OS (HR: 0.76, P=0.06). Conclusion: On propensity-score-adjusted analysis, adjuvant RT was associated with improved survival in selected subsets of patients with invasive IPMN, particularly those with T3/T4 tumors and LN involvemen

    The Effect of Race/Ethnicity on the Age of Colon Cancer Diagnosis

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    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States. Notably, racial/ethnic disparities exist in both incidence and mortality. PURPOSE: The aim of this case study was to investigate the impact of race/ethnicity on age at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in a defined population in Suffolk County, NY. METHODS: Data were retrospectively collected on race/ethnicity, health insurance status, age at diagnosis, stage at diagnosis, gender, smoking status, alcohol intake, tumor location, and body mass index for colorectal cancer patients with medical records in the Stony Brook University Medical Center database (2005-2011). Population-based data on Hispanic and non-Hispanic Whites were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of New York State for an overlapping time period. Permutation-based ANCOVA and logistic regression with stepwise variable selection were conducted to identify covariates and first-order interactions associated with younger age at diagnosis and cancer stage as a dependent categorical variable. RESULTS: Of 328 colorectal cancer patients, Hispanics were diagnosed at a median younger age of 57y vs. 67y than non-Hispanic Whites (FDR = 0.001). Twenty-six percent of Hispanics were diagnosed with colorectal cancer prior to the recommended age (50y) for colorectal cancer surveillance compared to 11% of non-Hispanic Whites (FDR =0.007). Analysis of New York State registry data corroborated our findings that Hispanic colorectal cancer patients were diagnosed at a median younger age than non-Hispanic Whites. Permutation-based ANCOVA identified race/ethnicity and health insurance as significantly associated with age of diagnosis (P=0.001). Logistic regression selected (younger) age at diagnosis as being significantly associated with stage IV disease. The limitations of the case study reside in the use of self-reporting of race and ethnicity and in the small sample sizes. CONCLUSIONS: Hispanics may be at higher risk for colorectal cancer (y) and younger age at diagnosis is associated with advanced disease

    Patterns of care and treatment outcomes of patients with astroblastoma: A National Cancer Database analysis

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    AIM: To evaluate the use of chemotherapy and radiation, and their outcomes for patients with astroblastoma. PATIENTS & METHODS: This is a retrospective review of patients extracted from the National Cancer Database. We investigated overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier curves. Cox proportional hazards models were used to correlate OS with risk variables and treatments. RESULTS: OS at 5 years was 79.5%. Patients with high-grade tumors were more likely to receive chemotherapy and radiation. Patients with high-grade astroblastoma who did not receive adjuvant radiation had poor survival. CONCLUSION: Patients with astroblastoma should be treated with curative intent. Radiation is likely beneficial in high-grade astroblastoma. The exact role of radiation and chemotherapy following surgical resection warrant further investigation

    The accuracy of chemotherapy ascertainment among colorectal cancer patients in the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results registry program

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    Abstract Background Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) public research database does not include chemotherapy data due to concerns for incomplete ascertainment. To compensate for perceived lack of data quality many researchers use SEER-Medicare linked data, limiting studies to persons over age 65. We sought to determine current SEER ascertainment of chemotherapy receipt in two relatively large SEER registries compared to patient-reported receipt and to assess patterns of under-ascertainment. Methods In 2011–14, we surveyed patients with Stage III colorectal cancer reported to the Georgia and Metropolitan Detroit SEER registries. 1301/1909 eligible patients responded (68% response rate). Survey responses regarding treatment and sociodemographic factors were merged with SEER data. We compared patient-reported chemotherapy receipt with SEER recorded chemotherapy receipt. We estimated multivariable regression models to assess associations of under-ascertainment in SEER. Results Eighty-five percent of patients reported chemotherapy receipt. Among those, 10% (n = 104) were under-ascertained in SEER (coded as not receiving chemotherapy). In unadjusted analyses, under-ascertainment was more common for older patients (11.8% age 76+ vs. < 9% for all other ages, p = 0.01) and varied with SEER registries (10.2% Detroit vs. 6.8% Georgia; p = 0.04). On multivariable analyses, chemotherapy under-ascertainment did not vary significantly by any patient attributes. Conclusion We found a 10% rate of under-ascertainment of adjuvant chemotherapy for resected, stage III colorectal cancer in two SEER registries. Chemotherapy under-ascertainment did not disproportionately affect any patient subgroups. Use of SEER data from select registries is an important resource for researchers investigating contemporary chemotherapy receipt and outcomes.https://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/143192/1/12885_2018_Article_4405.pd

    Marital status and survival in pancreatic cancer patients: a SEER based analysis.

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    BACKGROUND: Recent findings suggest that marital status affects survival in patients with different types of cancer. However, its role in the survival of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether there was an association between marital status and overall survival (OS) in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: Adult patients diagnosed with PDAC between 1998 and 2003 with known marital statuses were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry of the National Cancer Institute. OS for these patients was plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparative risks of mortality were evaluated by using univariate and multivariate-adjusted Cox regression models. RESULTS: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, we found that the median overall survival of patients was 4 months and 3 months (p CONCLUSIONS: Marital status is an independent prognostic factor of both perioperative and long-term survival in patients with PDAC. This observation may suggest a suboptimally met psychosocial need among PDAC patients that is partially fulfilled by the support system provided by marriage

    Readmissions with multidrug-resistant infection in patients with prior multidrug resistant infection

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    OBJECTIVETo determine incidence of and risk factors for readmissions with multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) infections among patients with previous MDRO infection.DESIGNRetrospective cohort of patients admitted between January 1, 2006, and October 1, 2015.SETTINGBarnes-Jewish Hospital, a 1,250-bed academic tertiary referral center in St Louis, Missouri.METHODSWe identified patients with MDROs obtained from the bloodstream, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)/bronchial wash, or other sterile sites. Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC) and European CDC definitions of MDROs were utilized. All readmissions ≤1 year from discharge from the index MDRO hospitalization were evaluated for bloodstream, BAL/bronchial wash, or other sterile site cultures positive for the same or different MDROs.RESULTSIn total, 4,429 unique patients had a positive culture for an MDRO; 3,453 of these (78.0%) survived the index hospitalization. Moreover, 2,127 patients (61.6%) were readmitted ≥1 time within a year, for a total of 5,849 readmissions. Furthermore, 512 patients (24.1%) had the same or a different MDRO isolated from blood, BAL/bronchial wash, or another sterile site during a readmission. Bone marrow transplant, end-stage renal disease, lymphoma, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa during index hospitalization were factors associated with increased risk of having an MDRO isolated during a readmission. MDROs isolated during readmissions were in the same class of MDRO as the index hospitalization 9%–78% of the time, with variation by index pathogen.CONCLUSIONSReadmissions among patients with MDRO infections are frequent. Various patient and organism factors predispose to readmission. When readmitted patients had an MDRO, it was often a pathogen in the same class as that isolated during the index admission, with the exception of Acinetobacter (~9%).Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:12–19</jats:sec

    A Bayesian approach to competing risks analysis with masked cause of death

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    Cause-specific analyses under a competing risks framework have received considerable attention in the statistical literature. Such analyses are useful for comparing mortality patterns across racial and/or age groups. Earlier work in the statistical literature focused on the situation when the cause of death is known. A challenging twist to the problem arises when the cause of death is not known exactly, but can be narrowed down to a set of potential causes that do not necessarily act independently. This phenomenon, referred to as masking , is often the result of incomplete or partial information on death certificates and/or lack of routine autopsy on every patient. In this article we propose a semiparametric Bayesian approach for analyzing competing risks survival data with masked cause of death. The models proposed do not assume independence among the causes, and are valid for an arbitrary number of causes. Further, the Bayesian approach is flexible in allowing a general pattern of missingness for the cause of death. We illustrate our methodology using breast cancer data from the Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.Peer Reviewedhttp://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/77443/1/3894_ftp.pd
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