12 research outputs found

    Australian Marine Research in Progress: Great Barrier Reef Region 1988-1989

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    The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, with the assistance of the CSIRO Information Services Unit, has produced this update of the computer-based information system on Australian Marine Research in Progress (AMRIP) for the Great Barrier Reef Region only

    Scientific approaches of community energy:a literature review

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    Scientific approaches of community energy:a literature review

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    Scientific approaches of community energy:a literature review

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    Economic Complexity and Human Development

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    This book combines the human development approach and innovation economics in order to explore the effects that structural economic change has on human development. The author discusses how innovation, social networks, economic dynamics and human development are interlinked, and provides several practical examples of social and micro-entrepreneurship in contexts as diverse as Peruvian rural villages and Brazil's urban area

    Scientific approaches of community energy, a literature review

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    In several European countries, an increasing part of the production of renewable energy is generated by citizen-owned production units. These units are installed and managed individually or by local communities, and the number of local energy initiatives, who aim to increase local energy production, is rising rapidly. This has resulted in a new research area we label as community energy. Community energy is defined as local production of renewable energy, governed by citizens, with a view to contribute to the transition to a sustainable energy system. In this study, the authors use community energy to encompass several terms that have been used so far in the literature, such as citizen鈥檚 power, grassroots energy, and local governance of energy production. They specifically address the role of the individual, acting as consumer, prosumer or citizen. The aim of the study is to identify the key issues and concepts covered in the community energy literature so far and to reflect on how it is being studied. It shows community energy is studied from a variety of perspectives, delivering insights that range from individual motivations of members to join these groups, the organisation of local community initiatives, their relations with local governments, regional support organisations and networks, to national policies that aim to stimulate decentralized community owned energy production. All approaches will have to specify and develop in order to understand and explain community energy in more detail. In addition, there is room to further reflect on the agency that is employed by local communities and how bottom-up changes in the energy structure occur. The authors argue that the study and practice of community energy could benefit from a transdisciplinary research approach, which integrates perspectives of multiple academic disciplines and non-academic stakeholders. Moreover, this could lead to policy development that is science-based and practice oriented.Publisher PD

    An evaluation of an enterprise framework for performance improvement in the emergency department of a rural district general hospital

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    An Enterprise Culture, which looks to replicate improvements to quality and efficiency demonstrated in the private sector, has evolved from health care policy in the English NHS. The aims of this research were to explore the theory underpinning the application of the policy and to challenge and test if the Enterprise Culture has provided a framework for performance improvement in a rural District General Hospital (DGH). The evolution and characteristics of the Enterprise Culture resulting from the convergence of political policy relating to health care revealed a centralised command and control approach to performance expectations and a decentralised means of achieving them through managers and competitive markets. Using a mixed methodology with a dominant quantitative, less dominant qualitative emphasis, this research examined the theory through a critical comparison of the Enterprise Culture present in a single case study of a rural DGH with the Purpose, Process, People (PPP) framework which has led to private sector success. Firstly, the study looked to understand the nature of the central Enterprise Culture target for hospital emergency care: that patients spend less than four hours in the Emergency Department. A quantitative analysis of service demand from patients found that attendance patterns offered opportunity to use PPP techniques to meet the four hour target, but that greater data availability would be necessary to make detailed calculations. A quantitative analysis of the resources provided revealed that capacity was not calculated, planned or monitored to meet demand. Furthermore, an ethnographic study of the operational activities of the hospital鈥檚 emergency care system uncovered a lack of defined process and competent actors, departmental barriers and reactionary decisions leading to poor performance against the four hour wait target. Secondly, an intervention was introduced to examine the Enterprise Culture鈥檚 ability to generate efficiency and quality improvements. The intervention (care plans and drug chart provision for patients who required clinical observation) addressed a need, specific to the case site and was identified and implemented by clinicians and managers within the hospital鈥檚 emergency care system. Practical barriers to conducting research in rural a DGH were encountered during the intervention and its evaluation. The intervention 2 also revealed that although the Enterprise Culture enabled an improvement intervention to meet local needs, pressure from the central target and the competence of people enacting the process did not support its continued efficacy. In conclusion, in my contributions to subject knowledge, I argue that the Enterprise Culture present in the case site does not support the policy aims for generating quality and efficiency. The central four hour target remains too influential and causes reactionary operational activities. Processes and staff competent in following them are not adequate to meet the demands placed on the service of the emergency care system studied. Finally, the whole emergency care system has a great influence on the Emergency Department鈥檚 performance and should be considered when evaluating its performance and decisions about service structure
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