3,669 research outputs found

    Writing for Balance: A Conversation with Doris Lessing

    Get PDF
    Earl G. Ingersoll has edited a collection of interviews with Doris Lessing, which OR Press will be publishing this spring. He teaches at SUNY College in Brockport, New York. Doris Lessing has published over 30 books, most recently African Laughter and The Real Thing: Stories and Sketches, both from HarperCollins 1992. She lives in London

    Body Narrative: An Analysis of the Symbolic Meaning of Hand in the Works of Doris Lessing

    Get PDF
    Doris Lessing was famous for her writing about women’s experience, however, her writing about body covered not only women but also men of varying age. Hand, as one of the body parts Lessing paid special attention to, was the best representation of Lessing’s thinking about violence and human nature. This paper argued that Doris Lessing, though usually wrote from women’s perspective, was a humanism writer instead of a prejudiced women artist since she spared much effort writing about the times and suffering people. The body narrative in the novels of Doris Lessing vividly revealed Lessing’s representation of the society and her optimistic attitude toward life though in difficult times

    The Horizon Conquerors: Post-war London through Colonial Eyes.

    Get PDF
    Doris Lessing and V.S. Naipaul both arrived in London a few years after the end of the Second World War. This paper looks at their perceptions of the city as 'colonials', as seen from their fiction and non-fiction writings

    The Evolution of Doris Lessing\u27s Art from a Mystical Moment to Space Fiction

    Get PDF
    After publishing ten major novels, Doris Lessing has begun writing what she calls \u27·space fiction\u27· for her new series entitled Canopus in Argos: Archives. In a review of the first two novels published in this series, namely, Shikasta ( 1979) and the Marriages Between Zones Three. Four, and Five (1980)1. Jean Pickering stresses that many of Doris Lessing\u27s most avid readers were initially attracted to her because of her insights about the female experience and because of her allegiance to nineteenth-century realism. Pickering suggests that Lessing\u27s growing interest in space fiction and Sufism (Islamic mysticism) has made these admirers increasingly uneasy.2 In retrospect, however, even these readers should recognize that the seeds of this later development were there from the beginning. To understand Doris Lessing\u27s recent enthusiasm for space fiction, it is important to see its roots in the mystical experience she describes in her early novel, Martha Quest (1952)

    The vexed “colour problem”: Doris Lessing and the “African Renaissance”

    Get PDF
    The question of an African Renaissance is drawing increasing debate among African scholars as they aspire for African unity and the revitalization of African cultures. This involves looking back to Africa’s past and evaluating traditions and customs in order to learn how to shape the future. In this paper it is argued that Doris Lessing, in her African Stories, anticipated post-liberation issues such as the protection of Indigenous Knowledge Systems which have become the cornerstone concepts of the African Renaissance today. She exposes the threat posed by colonial society to African traditions and thereby subverts colonial discourse. Keywords: Doris Lessing; African Renaissanc

    August 15, 2019: What Would “Bends Toward Justice” Mean to Doris Lessing?

    Get PDF
    Blog post, “What Would “Bends Toward Justice” Mean to Doris Lessing?“ discusses politics, theology and the law in relation to religion and public life in the democratic United States of America

    Reflections on Doris Lessing: Age, Enclosure, and the Female Experience

    Get PDF
    This thesis analyzes the life experiences of female protagonists in Doris Lessing stories. Often referencing the motif of the mirror in Lessing’s work, it discusses age, life circumstances, relationships, and more, and looks at how women are viewed and treated in these stories

    The Post-War Novel in Crisis: Three Perspectives

    Get PDF
    Three major novelists of the period following the second world war, Iris Murdoch, Doris Lessing and V.S. Naipaul, have pondered the question of why the post-war novel is unable to achieve the heights of its nineteenth-century predecessors. Each of these three writers has suggested remedies, to which they have aspired with varying degrees of success. And each of them offers, implicitly or explicitly, different reasons for the change. In this essay I will evaluate their arguments and attempt to account for some of the factors which give rise to the consciousness that they are different in some qualitative way from their predecessors. I will also discuss the effect such attitudes may have on their own work

    Discovering Doris Lessing: convergences between Islam and her thoughts

    Get PDF
    The 2007 Nobel literature laureate Doris Lessing (1919-2013) is one of the twentieth century’s most prolific and versatile British writers. Her literary career is marked by the robustness and diversity of her ideas. The plurality of voices in her work makes room for discovering a very different Lessing from how she is usually construed and for discussing some of her views in a new and somewhat unusual light. In this study, I intend to look at her thoughts on education, literature, racism, and women’s rights and locate possible commonalities between them and certain facets of Islamic thought. As she is considered a humanist, a secular writer of great stature, the “grande dame” of British writing of her time, and handles explicit sexual relationships, a sense of remoteness and incomprehension is perhaps palpable in any attempt to discover an “Islamic Doris Lessing.” However, given that she is known for her courage and outspokenness, as well as for making unconventional moves and iconoclastic statements sometimes at the expense of her literary reputation, it will be interesting to see her ideas from an Islamic perspective

    Grotesque maternity: reading "happiness" and its eugenics in Doris Lessing's The Fifth Child (1988)

    Get PDF
    This paper contexualises and reads Doris Lessing’s The Fifth Child (1988) as a criticism towards the Family Acts conducted by Thatcher’s government in 1980s Britain. The article principally draws attention to the main and minor protagonist’s “annomalous” bodies and their relation to ablism that underlies the British government in its utilitarian campaign to strengthen the values of “conventional families”. Lessing’s text shows the way in which society makes a mother be intimate to her child, simultaneously distancing them from society, and relating the child’s heath to the idea of “happiness”. To prove this close maternal relationship, first of all, we will look at the Family Acts that the Conservatives propounded in the eighties, and investigate the rhetorics involved in their justifying the blueprint of the “conventional family” (nuclear family, stable income, home purchase, moral for “healthy” reproduction and nurturing). Based upon this point, secondly, I will show how the couple Harriet and David internalise the “happiness” of the conventional family in Fifth, and the way in which their happiness is destroyed by the birth and growth of their fifth child, Ben, by the effect of the story’s Gothic narrative. Positioning Fifth in the neo-Gothic revival movement by women writers, I will argue how the Gothic narrative is employed in an effective manner in Fifth for blurring the boundaries of the bodies between mother and child: using the theories of Margrit Shildrick, I read it as the leakiness of the bodies in the text making readers uncertain as to who is the monster, the baby or the mother. The leaky maternal body, which represents the intimate physical relationship between the mother and the baby, and the Gothic narrative both lead to distancing the mother-and-child from society, as the mother/child are seen as monsters. Finally, this chapter will point out the narrative in which Ben is always closely associated with minor characters in the novel (the disabled and the unemployed). From these readings, Ben’s monstrous physicality and Harriet’s fixation on a “happy (conventional) family” shows Lessing’s accusation of the exclusive and utilitarian society that Thatcher made for Britain: behind the “happiness” that neoliberalism offers, the citizens in such utalitarian societies are asked to be productive and have able bodies, and especially for forming “happy conventional families”, mothers are asked to give birth to “healthy” children, who are productive for society at large
    • …
    corecore