2,087,795 research outputs found

    Conservation

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    Poetry by Laurie D. Graha

    A Citizen\u27s Guide to Protecting Sandown\u27s Wetlands and Water Resources

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    A Citizen\u27s Guide to Protecting Greenland\u27s Water Resources, PREP & Greenland Conservation Commission

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    Guide to Understand Brentwood\u27s Land Use Regulations

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    Analysis of hyperspectral imagery for macroalgae and eelgrass mapping

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    Protecting Hampton Harbor Watershed Project, Degnan, T

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    The purpose of this project was to provide significant educational efforts promoting land and water resource protection for two communities within the Hampton Harbor Watershed. The project was to include educational efforts aimed at promoting the NHEP Management Plan’s action items for protecting critical land and water resources, to provide sustained technical assistance that involved resource prioritization, support for public relations campaigns for open space bond campaigns, and the preparation of funding applications for important shoreland protection projects for the communities of Hampton and Hampton Falls. The project focus area was not defined, as much of the open undeveloped acreage in both communities was the main focus for protection efforts, which includes several hundreds of acres. The Protecting Hampton Harbor Watershed Project offered sustained assistance to the two conservation commissions, and was successful in helping to advance the implementation of two significant land and resource protection projects within the Hampton Harbor Watershed. Although no permanent protection project was completed in full during the length of the Protecting Hampton Harbor Watershed Project, significant education and outreach efforts have been achieved and two significant land protection projects are in process. In fact, with the assistance of this shoreland protection project, one landowner with significant holdings in both communities is participating in a permanent protection project currently underway. The educational efforts on land protection, conservation options, resource prioritization, funding opportunities, and the public relations information to support the passage of local open space bonds brought much enthusiasm into both communities. Both communities became very active and successful with their resultant actions, each with somewhat of a different twist. Moreover, the motivation for permanent protection efforts has been securely established in both communities, and both have a renewed sense of the importance of permanent stewardship of natural resources

    Annual Outflow and Annual Inflow of Water from/to Nebraska, 1950-1994

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    Annual Outflow/Inflow of Water from Nebraska, 1950-1985

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    Invasive Species Management and Buffer Outreach on Goss Farm, Rye, NH

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    The Goss Farm was permanently protected in November of 2010 with assistance from the USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service Farm and Ranch Lands Protection Program (FRPP) and is located directly adjacent to the Awcomin Salt Marsh, in Rye, New Hampshire. The Town of Rye Conservation Commission owns the land, and the RCCD holds the conservation easement on the property. The Piscataqua Region Estuaries Partnership (PREP) provided $9,930 in funding assistance to support the Rockingham County Conservation District in its partnership capacity with the Rye Conservation Commission and other natural resource agencies to complete outreach, to plan and complete integrated pest management control practices, and to establish a 100 foot shoreland buffer at the Goss Farm. All objectives originally proposed through the PREP funding request have been met and conservation practices and outreach efforts have exceeded initial expectations. This is in part due to the community commitment as well as supplemental funding sources that are supporting additional conservation practices. Through PREP’s assistance a 100 foot wide shoreland buffer was established in which a 2 foot by 3 foot sign is now located. The sign communicates the importance of shoreland buffer functions, and serves as a mechanism to further promote natural resource outreach and educational efforts at the site. During 2011 eight workshops were offered and over 75 people attended, with a significant component occurring on-the-ground at the Goss Farm. Local school groups attended on-site workshops and similar efforts will be offered in the spring of 2012 that will include native shoreland buffer plantings. After receipt of proper permits, invasive species were controlled using a variety of IPM control methods within the established shoreland buffer as well as other areas on the site. An initial Goss Farm Management Plan, 2011 was prepared and included an invasive species management component, and is expected to be updated annually. Local farmers are currently being interviewed to farm a portion of the site, and community gardens and a school plot are being defined for Goss Farm for the spring of 2012
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