74 research outputs found

    Enacting educational partnership: collective identity, decision-making (and the importance of muffin chat)

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    The rhetoric of partnership is ubiquitous in the current policy context. In education, partnerships take a number of forms among which is ‘interorganizational collaboration’ (IOC), defined as a partnership between institutions/organizations aimed at developing synergistic solutions to complex problems. But policy has a tendency to veneer, obscuring its enactment. The purpose of this paper is therefore to examine what such partnerships look like on the ground. Here we present an empirical analysis which aims to produce knowledge about the working of such collaborative groups and to provide insights into leadership within such partnerships. Drawing on communicative constitution of organizations (CCO) operationalised within a schema for understanding the emergence of collective identity in IOC, we undertake an analysis of meetings held by a working group comprising academics and local authority staff set up to develop masters level work-based professional learning for teachers. We ask, how do professionals working within different contexts create a collective identity that supports decision making, and what are the implications for leadership

    Coordinating the Uncoordinated Giant: Applying the Four Flows Model of Communicative Constitution of Organizations to the United States Weather Enterprise

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    Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)The US weather enterprise includes academia, the private weather industry, and government-funded forecasting, research, and dissemination agencies. While not an organization in its own right, the enterprise behaves like an organization of organizations. This thesis applies the communicative constitution of organizations, and McPhee and Zaug’s four flows model in particular, to the US weather enterprise. Each organization in the weather enterprise behaves like individual members of an organization would, which extends this theory to a conceptualization of organization that increases innovation, collaboration, and coordination. The weather is a constitutive force which calls the US weather enterprise into being. Finally, CCO is extended to other collaborative, coordinated efforts among the public and private sectors, indicating the possibilities of CCO as an attractive answer to the great organizational questions of the 21st century and beyond. Future research areas are considered, including how the US weather enterprise manages the unexpected and reduces uncertainty organizationally. Also, considerations as to how CCO can be applied to the incident command structure, often called forward during high-impact weather events, will be made

    Mission-driven communication for the non-profit organization: a case study of the Downtown Spokane Partnership

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    The development, content, and application of mission statements have been highly researched, studied, and discussed in generic terms. This case study was designed to develop and expand understanding of the mission of Downtown Spokane Partnership, rather than to generalize beyond it. Mission-focused questions were included in a communication audit conducted for Downtown Spokane Partnership [DSP], a non-profit organization [NPO] that advocates for the development of the downtown Spokane area. The study investigated perceptual differences and similarities of the DSP mission expressed by downtown business owners and DSP constituents compared to those expressed by DSP\u27s staff and board members. The results showed that the perceptions were congruent between most constituents, but there was inconsistency in the way those inside and outside the organization understood their roles in fulfilling the mission. After identifying areas of strength and opportunities for growth, these findings were presented to Downtown Spokane Partnership to increase mission-understanding and fulfillment congruency among Employees, Board Members, and external constituents --Leaf iv

    Postmodern/Poststructural Approaches

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    Postmodern and poststructural approaches to organizational communication are marked by an emphasis on ruptures, disjunctions, tensions, instabilities, and other inconsistencies as a part of everyday organizational life. This emphasis is part of an attempt to question, critique, and often compromise the normalized, mundane power structures that regulate organizational life. By questioning and critiquing, these approaches reveal norms and power structures as contingently constructed with particular interests at play. This contrasts with more traditional assumptions that treat norms and power structures as natural, neutral, and stable constructions. Poststructural and postmodern approaches to organizational communication find their roots in broader philosophical movements and the “linguistic turn” among organizational communication scholars. The linguistic turn of the 1980s saw an epistemological shift toward qualitative methods for understanding the communication/organization relationship and an ontological shift from the assumption that organizations are stable entities that contain communication to the assumption that organizations are more flexibly constructed through communication (see Putnam and Pacanowsky, 1983). Postmodern and poststructural approaches are two of many perspectives that were made possible by this shift, although there are plenty of others that follow the linguistic turn that do not claim the methods and assumptions of poststructural and postmodern approaches. Although poststructuralism and postmodernism are not synonymous, the two approaches are grounded in the same (Eurocentrically defined) historical moment. Understanding the influence of these philosophical movements on organizational communication approaches requires a broad understanding of the movements themselves

    Psychological Safety at Amazon: A CCO Approach

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    Understanding public relations in the ‘sharing economy’

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    In spite of the macro-economic impact of the so-called ‘sharing economy’ there is a nearly complete dearth of contributions from the communication academy to its discourse. More attention is overdue, particularly for the conceptual pressure the ‘sharing economy’ is exerting on the public relations function. The authors propose a reconceptualization of public relations by identifying the constitutive aspects of the sharing economy and bringing together the explanatory concepts ‘circuits of commerce’ and ‘viable matches’ from economic sociology and communicative constitution of organizations theory to develop the notions of ‘deliberate disintermediation’ and ‘circuits of communication’ in public relations. The contention is that by doing this, communicative acts not only contribute meaning in the sharing economy, but have economic value. Furthermore, the sharing economy poses challenges to the traditional forms of organizing public relations functions, but offers opportunities to realize different potential when public relations facilitates circuits of communication and becomes a meta-communicative competence embedded within the organization

    Introducing Nonprofit Communication and Mapping the Research Field

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    The declining informal collaboration corresponds to less civic engagement, political equity, solidarity, trust, and tolerance as well as associational life. In 2020, a case study of two NPOs revealed that one was adopting a strong entrepreneurial orientation, while the other integrated the traditional community orientation with more professionalization, confirming to partial marketization tendencies. The NGO-ization of society, visible in the increasing number of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) at the national and transnational level, tend to somewhat contradict Putnam’s thesis. On the other hand, the number of NGOs is not per se revealing of the quality of citizen participation in those organizations. The terms NGOS and nonprofit can be applied to the same organizational forms – some authors tend to consider the former as a type of nonprofit. Interestingly enough, in the diversity of approaches, and even definitions of this object, there is a common use of the excluding element to classify it: nongovernmental and nonprofit.info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersio

    Communication and organizational learning in adaptation of the Radio Republik Indonesia

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    Radio Republik Indonesia (RRI) had been the state media during the New Order era. However, since the fall of that regime in 1998, followed by the ratification of the Broadcasting Law Number 32 of 2002, RRI’s status changed to a public broadcasting institution (LPP). The change requires an organizational adaptation process which is not easy in practice. This study finds that communication can be both a driving factor and an obstacle to the adaptation process within the RRI organization. This research aims to explore the operationalization of communication in the adaptation process of the RRI and reveal how the flow of communication builds the relationship between members of the RRI organization; how organizational communication works in the learning process within the organization; and the dynamics of organizational learning in the adaptation process of the RRI organization. The results indicate that the dynamics of communication flows affect the organization’s communication climate. Meanwhile, organizational communication operates in several ways, namely: communication is a means to acquire as well as to conceal knowledge among RRI employees; communication helps the members of the organization understand a phenomenon from different perspectives; communication flows affect the distribution of communications; communication can be an accelerator as well as a barrier to organizational learning abilities. This study suggests further research on the role of communication to promote the internalization values of an organization into strategic decisions and concrete actions and the research on the roles of organizational culture and local culture in organizational adaptation
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