127 research outputs found

    Studying mathematics students’ learning experiences in Challenge-based education

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    This paper is of methodological nature. We present the empirical research methodology of a study that focuses on student learning experiences, in particular of mathematics students in an innovative learning environment, such as Challenge-based Education (CBE) at a Dutch university of technology. In this study, we present the case study of CBE in an innovative mathematics course on modelling, the mathematics “Modelling Week”. We draw attention to the methodology used to study this modelling course, where we investigated students' learning experiences in a monodisciplinary CBE-oriented master course. We explain the design of the study and the associated data collection strategies regarding students' use of resources (Schematic Representation of Resource system- SRRS) and their learning processes. In the poster presentation, we will show selected results that come from the different instruments to help us understand student learning experiences in innovative/CBE related mathematics courses.</p

    Studying mathematics students’ learning experiences in Challenge-based education

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    This paper is of methodological nature. We present the empirical research methodology of a study that focuses on student learning experiences, in particular of mathematics students in an innovative learning environment, such as Challengebased Education (CBE) at a Dutch university of technology. In this study, we present the case study of CBE in an innovative mathematics course on modelling, the mathematics “Modelling Week”. We draw attention to the methodology used to study this modelling course, where we investigated students’ learning experiences in a monodisciplinary CBE-oriented master course. We explain the design of the study and the associated data collection strategies regarding students’ use of resources (Schematic Representation of Resource system- SRRS) and their learning processes. In the poster presentation, we will show selected results that come from the different instruments to help us understand student learning experiences in innovative/CBE related mathematics courses

    Participation of mathematics and physics students in multidisciplinary challenge-based education at the end of a bachelor program

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    Many universities introduced Challenge-Based Education (CBE) as a way to innovate engineering education. Typically, in CBE students develop and use their knowledge in order to solve real-world problems in society, in multi-disciplinary groups and often in collaboration with external stakeholders. For departments of mathematics and physics innovations such as CBE are often not straightforward. In their strive for depth, they struggle for example with the multi-disciplinary nature of CBE. This study focused on the Bachelor Final Project in an innovation lab (IBFP) at a university of technology in the Netherlands. We have investigated the affordances and constraints for mathematics and physics students to participate in such IBFPs, and how these can be understood in terms of successful innovations in engineering education. Students from all departments can participate in IBFP, but mathematics and physics students have been practically absent. We investigated the reasons for this absence by studying university documents and interviewing stakeholders (N=13). We identified themes emerging from this data, which show that organizational issues played a role, but also factors related to educational innovations and the particular nature of mathematics and physics education. The study helps to understand innovation efforts towards CBE, involving mathematics and physics students.</p

    Upscaling A Challenge-Based And Modular Education Concept (CMODE-UP)

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    In 2019, a course at a Dutch University of Technology was redesigned towards challenge-based and modular education. The course was received positively by students and their learning outcomes (grades and engagement) increased compared to previous years. This redesign was quite intensive, and case-specific. It did not deliver a specific set of design principles that can easily be used to redesign other courses within the university or even other universities. Therefore, a follow-up project was started, that aims to deliver a framework to scale-up the course redesign tested in the previous study (CMODE; Challenge-based Modular On-demand Digital Education). This framework will be designed using practical principles and will be evidence-informed. The project consists of three stages: (1) informal interviews with key actors at our university, experienced in studying and/or designing modular instruction, a systematic literature review on challenge-based education and modular instruction; (2) a test of the design principles that were developed using the interviews and literature review; and (3) a test of the CMODE-up framework that was built on the results from the second stage, using think-out-loud protocols. In the current study we specifically focus on the first stage. A first look at the already existing literature around challenge-based education and modular instruction shows us that both concepts have been around for a long time in higher engineering education. Since education has become more and more digitized (and the development of MOOCs), it appears that the concepts have taken a quick increase in relevance. However, both concepts have only been studied minimally in relation to each other. We deem it thus highly relevant to first build a clear and proper view on both concepts, the strengths and weaknesses, and where both (can) meet. So that anyone who has intentions like ours - to implement both in higher education - can do this in an evidence-informed manner.</p

    Education for innovation: engineering, management and design multidisciplinary teams of students tackling complex societal problems through Design Thinking

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    [EN] Innovation education involves a different approach both for professors and students. It requires understanding people, technology and business to develop truly innovative solutions that can succeed in the market. The aim of this paper is to analyze the benefits, learning outcomes and self-learning perception about innovation from students participating in an innovative learning experience co-developed by an Electrical Engineering School, a Business School and a Design Institute. Challenge Based Innovation (CBI) is a program created by CERN to host educational projects where multidisciplinary teams of students tackle innovation challenges. The objective is to design solutions to social problems through Design Thinking. It was observed that engineering students, after this learning experience increase their understanding of user’s needs and the relevance of focusing on them when approaching innovation challenges. Also, they improve their ability to ideate break-through solutions thanks to a better understanding of the relationship between people, business and technology due to their in-depth interaction with management and design students. Furthermore, their self-confidence is significantly increased along with their entrepreneurial skills. The level of engineering student’s understating of innovation as a whole is higher with this approach compared to standard design-build projects performed at the Engineering Schools.Keywords: Design Thinking, Innovation, Challenge Based Education, Multidisciplinary projectshttp://ocs.editorial.upv.es/index.php/HEAD/HEAD18Charosky, G.; Hassi, L.; Leveratto, L.; Papageorgiou, K.; Ramos, J.; Bragos, R. (2018). Education for innovation: engineering, management and design multidisciplinary teams of students tackling complex societal problems through Design Thinking. Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València. 1081-1087. https://doi.org/10.4995/HEAD18.2018.81501081108

    Between Flexibility And Relativism: How Students Deal With Uncertainty In Sustainability Challenges

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    Universities open their doors to society, inviting the complexity of the world to enter engineering education through challenge-based courses. While working on complex issues, engineering students learn to deal with different kinds of uncertainty: uncertainty about the dynamics of a real-world challenge, the knowledge gaps in the problem, or the conflicting perspectives amongst the people involved. Although we know from previous research that students are likely to encounter these uncertainties in sustainability challenges, which metacognitive strategies they use to deal with them is unclear. We interviewed nine MSc students at the end of a challenge-based course at a Dutch university of technology. We asked the students how they dealt with uncertainty in collaboration with the commissioner, their student team, and the teachers. The interviews were analyzed through grounded, consensus-based coding by two researchers. Preliminary results show students use three main strategies. First, the different perspectives from peers in their team inform the position of the student. Second, students find expectation management of the commissioner essential, yet students struggle with how to do this in a professional and timely way. Third, students frame the uncertainties they encounter as part of the learning process, which allows them to accept the possibility of failure. This study provides first insights in metacognitive uncertainty strategies and suggests those strategies should become a more prominent topic in coaching students. When uncertainty becomes an explicit part of challenge-based education, students learn to deal with both the known and unknown in the transition to a sustainable society

    A cross curricular comparison of professional capabilities in engineering education

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    In this paper we studied the student’s perception of the acquisition of professional capabilities in Challenge based learning environments with a strong reflective component. The results show students feel the relevance of personnel development from the very moment the enter their master studies. However, they only truly acquire all the relevant professional capabilities when working in interdisciplinary teams on real life problems in interaction with stakeholders
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