4,401 research outputs found

    Preparation for Collegiate Music Theory and Aural Skills Through Repertoire

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    Music majors often struggle in first-year music theory and aural skills coursework. These struggles have lead to increased dropout rates among music students. Even those students who succeed in music theory course work often are not able to apply theory concepts to music literature. Some universities have identified this problem and sought to rectify it through offering remedial course work, however the universities should not bear this burden. Success in theory and aural skills is linked to mastery of music fundamentals and basic aural skills. Pre-college studies should focus on these subjects and not place too much emphasis on advanced music theory or performance skills alone. Performance studies represent a relevant and readily available platform in which to gain fundamental theory and aural skills. Performance teachers must take the responsibility to purposely integrate music theory and aural skills into their lessons and rehearsals. The ability to put theory into practice contributes to the making of a whole musician. Students studying theory and aural skills through repertoire will gain a more holistic understanding of music and these skills will have practical meaning for the student

    Incorporating Aural Skills in The Teaching of Middle and High School Instrumental Ensembles

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    University undergraduate instrumental music students possess a variety of abilities in ear-training regardless of their ability to perform on their major instrument. Some students may have received prior aural skills instruction in their middle and high school ensembles; their teachers may have included singing activities in their rehearsals. Scholarly research indicates incorporating aural skills in the teaching of instrumental ensembles improves students’ abilities in sight-reading, error detection, sense of tonality, and intonation. The purpose of this thesis is to identify the extent to which aural skills activities are being taught in U.S. middle and high school instrumental classrooms, and to advocate for their use by creating resources and example lessons for future classroom implementation. To discover what aural skills content middle and high school teachers include in their ensemble rehearsals, a survey was created to investigate current teaching practices of secondary instrumental teachers, with an emphasis on aural skills activities. The survey, written in QuestionPro, was distributed through the “Band Directors Group” on Facebook, a professional development community with over 25,000 members. The total number of participants in this study was 281 instrumental middle and high school teachers. The results of the survey indicate that a majority of teachers do include aural skills in their ensemble teaching. However, teachers wish they could include more aural skills in their ensembles, but lack the rehearsal time or resources to successfully implement these lessons prevent its implementation. Survey participants provided a list of published method books and resources they currently use as well as a short list of repertoire performed by their ensembles in the past year. Example exercises and sample lessons were created from these resources and repertoire to encourage teachers to discover creative ways to teach aural skills to their students

    Aural Skills in Developing Musicians: Uncovering Disparities in Secondary Music Learning

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    This study was conducted to evaluate the scope of aural skills development occurring in secondary music classrooms. The researcher hypothesized that several disparities would exist, namely regarding melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation. Participants took a survey in which they were asked to recall from a prescribed list, aural skills learned while in high school. They were also asked to provide demographic information including high school attended, current college major, and the number of collegiate aural skills courses completed to date. A number of subjective questions were asked as well, such as desired skills prior to collegiate study, and how aural skills study has affected ensemble performance, positively or negatively. Analysis of the collected data indicated that disparities exist in all areas, but particularly in the development of the following skills: melodic dictation, harmonic dictation, and modal scale identification

    Aural Skills I-IV (KSU)

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    This Grants Collection for Aural Skills I-IV was created under a Round Ten ALG Textbook Transformation Grant. The course transformation included the creation and revision of materials on the instructors\u27 Free Music Dictations website. Affordable Learning Georgia Grants Collections are intended to provide faculty with the frameworks to quickly implement or revise the same materials as a Textbook Transformation Grants team, along with the aims and lessons learned from project teams during the implementation process. Documents are in .pdf format, with a separate .docx (Word) version available for download. Each collection contains the following materials: Linked Syllabus Initial Proposal Final Reporthttps://oer.galileo.usg.edu/arts-collections/1006/thumbnail.jp

    The Process of Musicking: An Alternative to Melodic Dictation and Other Activities Involved in the Undergraduate Music Program

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    This thesis makes the claim that the current American undergraduate music institution does not effectively integrate the skills learned in aural skills courses; as a result, too few students are engaged in the learning process and fail to master the required skills. One common activity used in aural skills courses is melodic dictation, an activity which asks students to notate a performed melody. While activating a multitude of useful skills, melodic dictation could cause a cognitive overload due to demanding too many tasks to be performed simultaneously. A suggestion of implementing Musicking activities—which emphasize music as a process (an act), not an object—is made in order to remedy the problem. After a comprehensive review of existing literature and psychological research, this thesis affirms the need to revise the goals of the current aural skills curriculum and provides desired skill outcomes for the Musicking alternative activities through emphasis of the four Musicking Sets (Fluency, Short-term Memory, Intuition, and Communication), and concludes with examples of the alternative activities which emphasize the Musicking Sets. Finally, this thesis describes avenues for further research to implement a four-semester Musicking curriculum and methods of assessing the overall success rate of the alternative Musicking activities over present aural skills curricula. Adviser: Stanley V. Kleppinge

    The Process of Musicking: An Alternative to Melodic Dictation and Other Activities Involved in the Undergraduate Music Program

    Get PDF
    This thesis makes the claim that the current American undergraduate music institution does not effectively integrate the skills learned in aural skills courses; as a result, too few students are engaged in the learning process and fail to master the required skills. One common activity used in aural skills courses is melodic dictation, an activity which asks students to notate a performed melody. While activating a multitude of useful skills, melodic dictation could cause a cognitive overload due to demanding too many tasks to be performed simultaneously. A suggestion of implementing Musicking activities—which emphasize music as a process (an act), not an object—is made in order to remedy the problem. After a comprehensive review of existing literature and psychological research, this thesis affirms the need to revise the goals of the current aural skills curriculum and provides desired skill outcomes for the Musicking alternative activities through emphasis of the four Musicking Sets (Fluency, Short-term Memory, Intuition, and Communication), and concludes with examples of the alternative activities which emphasize the Musicking Sets. Finally, this thesis describes avenues for further research to implement a four-semester Musicking curriculum and methods of assessing the overall success rate of the alternative Musicking activities over present aural skills curricula. Adviser: Stanley V. Kleppinge

    Embodied Cognition in the Music Theory and Aural Skills Classrooms

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    Applying concepts of embodied cognition positively impacts pedagogy in the theory and aural skills classrooms. This thesis defines a holistic view of the student and identifies how classroom instruction from that perspective can benefit student learning as well as overall well-being. The opening chapters provide a brief scientific background and connect concepts of embodied cognition with specific music theory and aural skills examples from an interview. A select survey of the music theory pedagogy literature also illustrates principles of embodied cognition. Based on this background, the final chapter presents new sample lesson plans and discusses how to adapt to student needs

    Metaschemata and Working Memory: The Effect of Musical Knowledge on the Acquisition of Aural Skills

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    In the undergraduate music theory curriculum, aural skills are often regarded as more physical than cognitive, which I suspect is partially due to a lack of understanding as to which cognitive processes and tools are used when performing aural skills. I aim to assert that musical schemata, formed to recognize and anticipate the tendencies of familiar musical styles, highly influence student acquisition of aural skills. I then consider this assertion in light of recent studies of musical learning and discuss pedagogical applications. My main objectives are to a) assert that schemata evolve autonomously over a lifetime and may be actively helpful or obstructive in the efficient acquisition of aural skills, and b) consider the implications of this assertion for aural skills pedagogy. I conclude that instruction might be more efficient and effective when consciously geared toward building helpful musical schemata rather than when too geared toward the accomplishment of aural skills tasks

    Practical and Philosophical Reflections Regarding Aural Skills Assessment

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    Assessment in aural skills courses is a tricky intersection of instructors’ expectations, students’ skills in audiation, students’ perceptions and anxieties regarding assessment and performance, and the peculiarities of evaluative instruments. After several years in my teaching position at a large university, I became increasingly dissatisfied with assessment in the second-year aural skills program I coordinate. In short, I was displeased both with the nature of the student activities we evaluated and with the ways in which success on those activities was measured. Students’ and instructors’ frustrations convinced me of the need to make assessment more obviously relevant, less intimidating to students, and more reflective of students’ success in mastering the skills we hope to foster. My hope in sharing the problems I identified, and my responses to them, is to inspire introspection about what our aural skills assessment methods actually measure, the expertise we intend for students to gain from this part of their music studies, and the potentially dangerous distance between these two things. I must acknowledge in advance that, throughout this article, I presume an orthodox approach to collegiate aural skills instruction. Such an approach provides students with strategies for completing common audiation activities such as melodic and harmonic dictation and sightsinging, alongside in-class practice employing these strategies. Students’ mastery of audiation skills is tested periodically with dictation activities (i.e., quizzes and/or exams) and singing activities (i.e., “hearings” or “audits”), student performance on these activities is measured with an assessment tool, and the measurement becomes a basis for students’ grades in the class. It would be disingenuous to imply that this model is the only way in which an aural skills curriculum could work, or that it is without its faults. But rather than attacking this broad-stroked outline, which mirrors normative curricular practice at a great many American postsecondary schools that offer music degrees (including my own), in this essay I will consider closely the role and makeup of assessment activities in this model. Doing so can strengthen the student outcomes of such programs—and our measurements of those outcomes—without upsetting the entire curricular apple cart
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