558 research outputs found

    Against Animated Documentary?

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    Animated documentaries have been written about in a mostly positive way that explores the way the form enhances and expands the documentary agenda. This is true of scholarly and academic writing as well as that in the popular press and film reviews. However, some authors have taken issue with the ascription of the term ‚Äėdocumentary‚Äô to animated documentaries. In addition, there are potential issues regarding audience response to animated documentaries and the technical proficiency of the films themselves as they become more ubiquitous. This chapter explores the existing, and potential objections to and criticisms of animated documentary and suggests that a more ‚Äė360-degree‚Äô discussion of the form will enrich the scholarly discourse on animated documentary

    Animating Documentary Modes: Navigating a theoretical model for animated documentary practice

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    Music & Clowns is an animated documentary that intimately portrays the subjectivity and relationships between my brother, our parents, and myself. This film will function as a case study to facilitate a reflective exploration and practice-informed analysis of some of the theoretical frameworks relevant to animated documentary discourse. Placing emphasis on Bill Nichols’ modes of documentary, I trace the influences, interactions, and specific application that this theoretical topology has had on Music & Clowns. Expanding upon Nichols’ framework by way of visual metaphors, I develop increasingly sophisticated models of the interactions between practice and theory, maintaining Nichols’ topology to integrate live-action and animated documentary traditions.Key Words: Bill Nichols, documentary modes, animated documentary, theory, practice &nbsp

    Drawing the Unspeakable Understanding ’the other’ through narrative empathy in animated documentary

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    How to represent the suffering of distant others? An international exchange program between Africa and Europe was set up in 2006 to tackle this issue with the help of documentary filmmaking. A result was A Kosovo Fairytale (2009), a  case study of how animated documentary can provide insights in how to represent "the other". Theories of narrative empathy informs the understanding of the process as well as the final film. This paper examines animated documentary from three distinct perspectives. As a pedagogical tool to enhance cultural understanding, as a process of narrative empathy and as a coherent text which makes use of narrative strategies endemic to animated documentary in order to create emotional engagement. Conclusions suggest that animated documentary can be a novel way of representing the other, especially if narrative empathy is present throughout a production process, and that the process involves participatory elements where the subjects contribute to the narrative. Key words: empathy, narrative, Africa, representation, animated documentary, refuge

    Perspectives on uncertainty: animated documentary project

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    This project uses na interdisciplinary approach of combining social investigation methods with documentary filmmaking and traditional animation. The result was a 50-minute movie telling the story of five women who migrated to Portugal by choice and yet embraced an uncertain situation during this journey. They speak about their past experiences and the present while animation helps the audience to emotionally connected with stories. "Uncertainity" is the main issue these women discuss in the context of migration to Portugal.Este projecto trata-se de uma abordagem interdisciplinar que combina m√©todos de investiga√ß√£o social com produ√ß√£o de document√°rios e anima√ß√£o tradicional. O resultado culminou num filme de 50 minutos, que conta a hist√≥ria de cinco mulheres que imigraram para Portugal por escolha e, ainda assim, assumiram uma situa√ß√£o incerta durante esta jornada. Aqui, falam sobre as suas experi√™ncias passadas, assim como sobre o presente, enquanto a anima√ß√£o ajuda a que o p√ļblico se sinta conectado emocionalmente √†s suas hist√≥rias. "Incerteza" √© o problema principal que estas mulheres discutem no contexto de imigra√ß√£o para Portugal

    Recreating Reality: Waltz With Bashir, Persepolis, and the Documentary Genre

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    This paper examines Ari Folman‚Äôs Waltz With Bashir (2008) and Marjane Satrapi‚Äôs Persepolis (2007) to elucidate how artists, distributors, and audiences shape and define the porous boundaries of the documentary genre, and how such perceptions are shaped within a digital context. By analyzing how each film represents reality; that is, how documentaries attempt to represent the real world, this paper explores the elements of performativity within animated documentary as a reflection of both the growing fluidity of the documentary genre and the instability of the indexical in a digital age. In a digital context, where the ‚Äúreal‚ÄĚ can be manufactured at an increasing rate, stronger skepticism and cynicism push the documentary genre towards more subjective explorations, with animated documentaries serving as a key example of how genre distinctions have fluctuated in response

    Writing Animated Documentary: A Theory of Practice

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    This short discussion provides some introductory remarks on writing for the documentary form in animation. Taking into account theories of the place of animation in utilitarian films, avant-garde works and the essay film, the analysis, based on auto-ethnographic insights, provides some methods and approaches to developing animated documentary work. These include ‚ÄėMaking Animation Choices‚Äô,¬† ‚ÄėStaging in Space‚Äô, ‚ÄėUsing Attachment and Detachment‚Äô, developing ‚ÄėEpisodic lists and Micro-Narratives‚Äô, and deploying ‚ÄėTransition and Associative Relations‚Äô. The analysis seeks to show that these approaches to the animated documentary reveal and evidence a theory of practice, and a practice of theory

    A new language of truth: the role of animation in a fast changing world

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    Nea Ehrlich‚Äôs Animating Truth: Documentary and Visual Culture in the 21st Century brings together her research into the relationship of animation to contemporary technoculture, and the ways in which this culture is changing the nature of what we understand as the ‚Äėdocumentary‚Äô. This book brings animated documentary scholarship firmly into the contemporary media landscape. By beginning to develop new conceptual tools with which to discuss and analyse new media forms, Ehrlich has created a helpful book that breathes fresh ideas into animated documentary scholarship

    Conveying Lebanon’s Cluster Bomb Issue through Film

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    Death in the Fields is an animated documentary that focuses on the cluster bomb crisis in southern Lebanon

    Animating Truth

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    Animating Truth examines the rise of animated documentary in the 21st century, and addresses how non-photorealistic animation is increasingly used to depict and shape reality

    Out of sight: using animation to document perceptual brain states

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    It is acknowledged that the genre of animated documentary is particularly suited to depicting the subjective point of view (Wells, 1997, Honess Roe, 2013). It has also been suggested that animated documentary may have a tendency toward collaborative working methods (Ward, 2005: 94). This PhD work explores and expands these suggestions and presents the development of a methodology adapted from what has been termed collaborative ethnography (Lassiter, 2005) when using animation to document perceptual brain states. The claim to originality in this thesis lies in the methodological approach taken through the documenting of idiopathic perceptual brain states, previously unrepresented in animation. It involves a shifting of the roles of subject and director to collaborative consultant and facilitator respectively, and differentiates between the recording of an animated document and the creation of an animated documentary . It rejects the sound reliant template of the 'animated interview' (Str√łm, 2005: 15) as the dominant model of creating animated documents, which assumes both that the indexical is crucial to documenting, and that this can only be achieved in animation through the use of indexical sound. It agrees with Tom Gunning s argument that Charles Sanders Pierce's original idea of the index as part of an interconnected triad of signs (index, symbol and icon) has been abstracted from its richer signifying context and extracted a simplified version of what Pierce intended it to mean (a trace or impression left by an object) to become a 'diminished concept' (2007:30-1), essentially a short hand coda in this instance for document . The practice in this work challenges this by presenting an alternative; using a collaborative cycle methodology
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