A study of the relationship between interoceptive sensibility and distress tolerance in community and college samples

Abstract

Interoceptive sensibility (IS) involves the detection, integration, and interpretation of internal bodily signals, primarily from cardiovascular, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal systems. Dysfunction in interoceptive processing has been increasingly recognized as a clinically relevant factor in numerous neurological, psychiatric, and behavioral disorders. This thesis aimed to elucidate the relationship between interoceptive sensibility and distress tolerance, hypothesizing that individuals with heightened interoceptive sensibility may exhibit poorer distress tolerance, potentially influencing emotional regulation and maladaptive coping mechanisms. To explore these relationships, two studies have been conducted utilizing self-report measures of interoceptive sensibility and distress tolerance in community and college samples. In a study of college students, a significant positive correlation between interoceptive sensibility and poorer distress tolerance. In a study recruiting participants from a south-eastern United States metropolitan area, a non-significant positive relationship between interoceptive sensibility and poorer distress tolerance. Implications, limitations, and future directions are discussed

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Last time updated on 15/05/2024

This paper was published in UTC Scholar.

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