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The global transformation: the nineteenth century and the making of modern international relations

By Barry Buzan and George Lawson

Abstract

Unlike many other social sciences, International Relations (IR) spends relatively little time assessing the impact of the 19th century on its principal subject matter. As a result, the discipline fails to understand the ways in which a dramatic reconfiguration of power during the ‘long 19th century’ served to recast core features of international order. This paper examines the extent of this lacuna and establishes the ways in which processes of industrialization, rational state-building, and ideologies of progress served to destabilize existing forms of order and promote novel institutional formations. The changing character of organized violence is used to illustrate these changes. The paper concludes by examining how IR could be rearticulated around a more pronounced engagement with ‘the global transformation’

Topics: JZ International relations
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Year: 2013
DOI identifier: 10.1111/isqu.12011
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lse.ac.uk:44894
Provided by: LSE Research Online

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