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Trade Traps: Why EU-ACP Economic Partnership Agreements pose a threat to Africa’s development.

By Cosmas C. M. Ochieng and Sharman Tom
Publisher: ActionAid
Year: 2004
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lancs.ac.uk:34763
Provided by: Lancaster E-Prints

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Citations

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