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Decision-making and strategic thinking through analogies

By Dr Alexandre Linhares

Abstract

When faced with a complex scenario, how does understanding arise in one’s mind? How does one integrate disparate cues into a global, meaningful whole? Consider the chess game: how do humans avoid the combinatorial explosion? How are abstract ideas represented? The purpose of this paper is to propose a new computational model of human chess intuition and intelligence. We suggest that analogies and abstract roles are crucial to solving these landmark problems. We present a proof-of-concept model, in the form of a computational architecture, which may be able to account for many crucial aspects of human intuition, such as (i) concentration of attention to relevant aspects, (ii) \ud how humans may avoid the combinatorial explosion, (iii) perception of similarity at a strategic level, and (iv) a state of meaningful anticipation over how a global scenario \ud may evolve

Topics: Perceptual Cognitive Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Peer Review, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Vision
Year: 2008
OAI identifier: oai:cogprints.org:6138
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    Citations

    1. (1993). Chess and machine intuition.

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