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Parental Exposure to Carcinogens and Risk for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Colombia, 2000-2005

By Miguel Ángel Castro-Jiménez and Luis Carlos Orozco-Vargas
Topics: Original Research
Publisher: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:3181179
Provided by: PubMed Central

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  3. (2011). (continued) Crude Odds Ratios for Childhood ALL, by Parental Clinical Conditions, Risk Behaviors, and Environmental Exposures Before and During Index Pregnancy, Colombia, 2000-2005a (Continued on next page)VOLUME 8: NO.
  4. (2000). a Based on 85 case-control pairs. Cases were children aged 0-1 y who were newly diagnosed with ALL between
  5. (2000). a Cases were children aged 0-1 y who were newly diagnosed with ALL between
  6. and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  7. (2000). b Cases were children aged 0-1 y who were newly diagnosed with ALL between
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