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SCRIPTKELL : a tool for measuring cognitive effort and time processing in writing and other complex cognitive activities

By A Piolat, O Olive, JY Roussey, O Thunin and J C Ziegler

Abstract

We present SCRIPTKELL, a computer-assisted experimental tool that makes it possible to measure the time and cognitive effort allocated to the subprocesses of writing and other cognitive activities, SCRIPTKELL was designed to easily use and modulate Kellogg's (1986) triple-task procedure,.which consists of a combination of three tasks: a writing task (or another task), a reaction time task (auditory signal detection), and a directed retrospection task (after each signal detection during writing). We demonstrate how this tool can be used to address several novel empirical and theoretical issues. In sum, SCRIPTKELL should facilitate the flexible realization of experimental designs and the investigation of critical issues concerning the functional characteristics of complex cognitive activities

Topics: Cognitive Psychology
Year: 1999
OAI identifier: oai:cogprints.org:3613

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