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Blocking eIF4E-eIF4G Interaction as a Strategy To Impair Coronavirus Replication▿

By Regina Cencic, Marc Desforges, David R. Hall, Dima Kozakov, Yuhong Du, Jaeki Min, Raymond Dingledine, Haian Fu, Sandor Vajda, Pierre J. Talbot and Jerry Pelletier

Abstract

Coronaviruses are a family of enveloped single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses causing respiratory, enteric, and neurologic diseases in mammals and fowl. Human coronaviruses are recognized to cause up to a third of common colds and are suspected to be involved in enteric and neurologic diseases. Coronavirus replication involves the generation of nested subgenomic mRNAs (sgmRNAs) with a common capped 5′ leader sequence. The translation of most of the sgmRNAs is thought to be cap dependent and displays a requirement for eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F), a heterotrimeric complex needed for the recruitment of 40S ribosomes. We recently reported on an ultrahigh-throughput screen to discover compounds that inhibit eIF4F activity by blocking the interaction of two of its subunits (R. Cencic et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 108:1046–1051, 2011). Herein we describe a molecule from this screen that prevents the interaction between eIF4E (the cap-binding protein) and eIF4G (a large scaffolding protein), inhibiting cap-dependent translation. This inhibitor significantly decreased human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) replication, reducing the percentage of infected cells and intra- and extracellular infectious virus titers. Our results support the strategy of targeting the eIF4F complex to block coronavirus infection

Topics: Vaccines and Antiviral Agents
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:3126520
Provided by: PubMed Central
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