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Molecular buffer using a PANDA ring resonator for drug delivery use

By N Suwanpayak, MA Jalil, MS Aziz, J Ali and PP Yupapin

Abstract

A novel design of molecular buffer for molecule storage and delivery using a PANDA ring resonator is proposed. The optical vortices can be generated and controlled to form the trapping tools in the same way as the optical tweezers. In theory, the trapping force is formed by the combination between the gradient field and scattering photons, which is reviewed. By using the intense optical vortices generated within the PANDA ring resonator, the required molecules can be trapped and moved (transported) dynamically within the wavelength router or network, ie, a molecular buffer. This can be performed within the wavelength router before reaching the required destination. The advantage of the proposed system is that a transmitter and receiver can be formed within the same system, which is available for molecule storage and transportation

Topics: Original Research
Publisher: Dove Medical Press
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:3107716
Provided by: PubMed Central

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