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Introduction: The Third International Conference on Epigenetic Robotics

By Luc Berthouze and Christopher G. Prince

Abstract

This paper summarizes the paper and poster contributions to the Third International Workshop on Epigenetic Robotics. The focus of this workshop is on the cross-disciplinary interaction of developmental psychology and robotics. Namely, the general goal in this area is to create robotic models of the psychological development of various behaviors. The term "epigenetic" is used in much the same sense as the term "developmental" and while we could call our topic "developmental robotics", developmental robotics can be seen as having a broader interdisciplinary emphasis. Our focus in this workshop is on the interaction of developmental psychology and robotics and we use the phrase "epigenetic robotics" to capture this focus

Topics: Developmental Psychology, Artificial Intelligence, Robotics
Publisher: Lund University Cognitive Studies
Year: 2003
OAI identifier: oai:cogprints.org:3252

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