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Plasma Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Age-Related Physical Performance Decline

By Angela M. Abbatecola, Antonio Cherubini, Jack M. Guralnik, Cristina Andres Lacueva, Carmelinda Ruggiero, Marcello Maggio, Stefania Bandinelli, Giuseppe Paolisso and Luigi Ferrucci

Abstract

Due to supporting evidence that dietary patterns may have a significant role in the maintenance of good physical performance with aging, we tested whether plasma fatty acids, saturated fatty acids (SFA), and polyunsaturated (PUFA) fatty acids are cross-sectionally associated with different physical performance and predict changes in physical performance over a 3-year period. Data were from the InCHIANTI study, a population-based study of older Italians. Plasma fatty acids were measured at enrollment (1998–2000), and outcome variables, Summary Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and time to walk 7 meters (m) were measured at enrollment and after 3 years (2001–2004). At enrollment, 330 participants had significantly impaired lower extremity performance (defined as a SPPB score ≤9). Adjusting for age, participants with a SPPB score >9 had higher levels of total PUFA, n-3 PUFA, and n-6 PUFA, while significantly lower levels of SFA than those with a SPPB score <9. Baseline SPPB scores were also associated with n-3 PUFA (β = 0.148, p = 0.031), whereas the 7-m walk time was associated with total PUFA (β = −0.068, p = 0.008), after adjusting for potential confounders. Of the 884 participants with a SPPB score >9 at baseline, 114 (12.9%) developed impaired lower extremity performance (SPPB ≤9). In fully adjusted logistic models, baseline n-3 PUFA levels were inversely related to the risk of developing a decline in SPPB to ≤9 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.08–0.53), while the n-6/n-3 ratio was associated with a higher risk of SPPB decline to ≤9 (OR = 5.23; 95% CI = 2.02–13.51). In multivariate regression models, the n-6/n-3 ratio was associated with a longer time to walk 7 m (β = 0.396, p = 0.037). n-3 PUFA plasma levels, which most likely reflect dietary intake, seem to protect against accelerated decline of physical performance. A higher n-6/n-3 ratio was associated with higher risk of developing poor physical performance and slower walking speed

Topics: Original Papers
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2674224
Provided by: PubMed Central
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