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Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California

By C Suzanne Lea, Nancy P Gordon, Lee Ann Prebil, Rochelle Ereman, Connie S Uratsu and Mark Powell
Topics: Research Article
Publisher: BioMed Central
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2670264
Provided by: PubMed Central
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