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Mistletoe treatment in cancer-related fatigue: a case report

By Kathrin Wode, Thomas Schneider, Ingrid Lundberg and Gunver S Kienle

Abstract

Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a major and very common disabling condition in cancer patients. Treatment options do exist but have limited therapeutic effects. Mistletoe extracts are widely-used complementary cancer treatments whose possible impact on CRF has not been investigated in detail. A 36-year-old Swedish woman with a 10-year history of recurrent breast cancer, suffering from severe CRF, started complementary cancer treatment with mistletoe extracts. Over two and a half years a correspondence was observed between the intensity of mistletoe therapy and the fatigue. Mistletoe extracts seemed to have a beneficial, dose-dependent effect on CRF. Although such effect has also been noted in clinical studies, it has never been the subject of detailed investigation. More research should clarify these observations

Topics: Case Report
Publisher: BioMed Central
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2654867
Provided by: PubMed Central
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