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Coming together to document mortality in conflict situations: proceedings of a symposium

By Ruwan Ratnayake, Olivier Degomme and Debarati Guha-Sapir

Abstract

The use of epidemiology in documenting the mortality experience in complex emergencies has become pervasive in humanitarian practice. Recent assessments in Iraq and Darfur have provoked much discussion on the assessment of mortality in scientific and policy spheres. In this context, the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative held an inter-disciplinary symposium to examine the topic among epidemiologists, demographers, forensic scientists and legal and human rights investigators

Topics: Meeting Report
Publisher: BioMed Central
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2654481
Provided by: PubMed Central
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