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Domain Hierarchy and closed Loops (DHcL): a server for exploring hierarchy of protein domain structure

By Grzegorz Koczyk and Igor N. Berezovsky

Abstract

Domain hierarchy and closed loops (DHcL) (http://sitron.bccs.uib.no/dhcl/) is a web server that delineates energy hierarchy of protein domain structure and detects domains at different levels of this hierarchy. The server also identifies closed loops and van der Waals locks, which constitute a structural basis for the protein domain hierarchy. The DHcL can be a useful tool for an express analysis of protein structures and their alternative domain decompositions. The user submits a PDB identifier(s) or uploads a 3D protein structure in a PDB format. The results of the analysis are the location of domains at different levels of hierarchy, closed loops, van der Waals locks and their interactive visualization. The server maintains a regularly updated database of domains, closed loop and van der Waals locks for all X-ray structures in PDB. DHcL server is available at: http://sitron.bccs.uib.no/dhcl

Topics: Articles
Publisher: Oxford University Press
OAI identifier: oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:2447749
Provided by: PubMed Central
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