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More than a game: sports-themed video games & player narratives

By G Crawford and V Gosling

Abstract

This paper considers of the social importance of sports-themed video games, and more specifically, discusses their use and role in the construction of gaming and wider social narratives. Here, building upon our own and wider sociological and video games studies, we advocate adopting an audience research perspective that allows for consideration of not only narratives within games, but also how these are used and located within the everyday lives of gamers. In particular, we argue that sports-themed games provide an illustrative example of how media texts are utilized in identity construction, performances and social narratives

Topics: HM, other
Publisher: Human Kinetics
OAI identifier: oai:usir.salford.ac.uk:2713

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