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ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME AND ENVIRONMENTAL

By Mark A. Greenberg, Kenrad E. Nelson, Bertram and W. Carnow

Abstract

60612) and B. W. Carnow. A study of the relationship between sudden infant death syndrome and environmental factors. Am J Epidemiol 98: 412^122, 1973.—The incidence of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a major cause of death in children one week to one year of age, has been shown to be increased during the winter season and among low socioeconomic class and low birth-weight infants. In one study, the inci-dence of SIDS was shown also to be correlated with rapid temperature fall and increased wind speed during the winter time. Since these epi-demiologic features of the disease and the relationship to meteorologic changes might be explained by increased air pollution levels occurring in lower economic areas during the winter heating season, a study was undertaken to examine the relationship between SIDS and the air pol-lutant, sulfur dioxide (SO2). Also, the relationships between SIDS and certain meteorologic variables (temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and humidity) were examined using a stepwise, multivarient regressio

Year: 1973
OAI identifier: oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.1014.805
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