Famine and fashion: needlewomen in the nineteenth century

Abstract

The fifteen articles in this book address the appearance of the nineteenth-century seamstress as a 'real' figure in the changing economies of nineteenth-century Britain, America, and France, and as an important cultural icon in the art and literature of the period. It assembles the work of leading American, British and Canadian scholars from many different fields, including art history, literary criticism, gender studies, labor history, business history, and economic history to draw together recent scholarship on needlewomen from a variety of different disciplines and methodologies. Famine and Fashion will therefore appeal to anyone studying images of work in the nineteenth century, popular and canonical nineteenth-century literature, the history of women's work, the history of sweated labor, the origins of the ready-made clothing industry and early feminism

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    Anglia Ruskin Research Online

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    oai:arro.anglia.ac.uk:293376Last time updated on 2/20/2017

    This paper was published in Anglia Ruskin Research Online.

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