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Complete Freedom from Addiction, through Christ: Observation and Life-Stories from the former Soviet Union and Interviews with International Rehabilitation Leaders

By Alison Sharon Giblett

Abstract

Alison Giblett examines principles of the effective drug and alcohol rehabilitation of thousands of addicts in the former Soviet Union using 50 life-stories of ex-addicts and personal observation over six years visiting 60 rehabilitation centres. Addiction is understood to be primarily a spiritual problem that has powerful psychological and physical consequences leading to destruction, depression and death. Interviews with 20 rehab leaders’ from 12 countries broadens the evidence base. Addressing the core need of substance abusers, alcoholics and co-dependents the hypothesis evaluates the Biblical process of conversion and discipleship as appropriate and effective to bring freedom from addiction. Spiritual regeneration through repentance and faith in Jesus was found to lead to recovery with ongoing Christian discipleship, application of the Bible and the Holy Spirit’s gifts. The ex-addicts described their current life with God as more fulfilling than at any time before or during their addiction. Cravings to relapse need not be fought in isolation and chemical substitutes do not satisfy or free the human soul. Recommendations are made for addicts, ex-addicts, programme leaders, churches, leadership development and government drug services to focus resources on long term, cost effective solutions that yield true harm reduction and restore society

Topics: BR Christianity, HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform, HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
Year: 2009
OAI identifier: oai:etheses.bham.ac.uk:410
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