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Distribution of aggregate income in Portugal from 1995 to 2000 within a SAM (Social Accounting Matrix) framework. Modeling the household sector

By Susana Santos

Abstract

Aggregated Social Accounting Matrices (SAMs) will be constructed for the Portuguese economy from 1995 to 2000, based on the country’s national accounts statistics. The economic flows associated with households, enterprises, government and other institutions will be analysed, as well as their evolution, whilst accounting multipliers will be calculated to facilitate the study of the effects resulting from changes in household income. Therefore, SAMs are modelled and structural path analysis will be used for the decomposition of the calculated multipliers. At the end, the general guidelines will be established for following the study of income distribution and poverty in Portugal.Social Accounting Matrix; Income distribution.

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  1. 1 Actual household final consumption
  2. 1 Current taxes on income, wealth, etc., employees’ social contributions, social contributions by self-employed and non-employed persons and miscellaneous current transfers received by government from households
  3. 1 Net non-life insurance premiums and miscellaneous current transfers received by the rest of the world from households; direct purchases abroad by residents
  4. 1 Social benefits other than social transfers in kind and miscellaneous current transfers within households
  5. 10 Gross mixed income plus net property income received by the households
  6. 10 Gross operating surplus plus net property income received by financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households
  7. 10 Gross operating surplus plus net property income received by general government - 30 -Row Col. Contents
  8. 10 Gross operating surplus plus net property income received by nonfinancial corporations
  9. 10 Property income received by the rest of the world
  10. 11 Compensation of employees paid by the activities
  11. 11 Gross operating surplus of activities
  12. 11 Minus other subsidies on production received, by activities, from the institutions and other countries of the European
  13. 11 Other taxes on production net of subsidies (on production)
  14. 12 Imports plus the part of taxes on products received by the institutions of the European Union net of the subsidies (on products) received from the same institutions
  15. 12 Output of goods and services
  16. 12 Taxes on products paid by the national institutions net of subsidies (on products) received by the same institutions
  17. 13 Compensation of employees paid by the rest of the world (from nonresident employers)
  18. 13 Current international cooperation and miscellaneous current transfers received by government from the rest of the world
  19. 13 Exports plus direct purchases in domestic market by non-residents and the c.i.f./f.o.b. adjustment
  20. 13 Investment grants and other capital transfers from the rest of the world to government
  21. 13 Investment grants and other capital transfers from the rest of the world to households
  22. 13 Investment grants and other capital transfers from the rest of the world to non-financial corporations
  23. 13 Investment grants from the rest of the world to non-profit institutions serving households
  24. 13 Net lending of the rest of the world /Net borrowing of the Portuguese economy -
  25. 13 Net non-life insurance premiums and non-life insurance claims received by financial corporations from the rest of the world
  26. 13 Non-life insurance claims received by non-financial corporations from the rest of the world
  27. 13 Property income paid by the rest of the world
  28. 13 Social benefits other than social transfers in kind, non-life insurance claims and miscellaneous current transfers received by households from the rest of the world
  29. 14 Net lending (-)/borrowing (+) of financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households
  30. 14 Net lending (-)/borrowing (+) of government
  31. 14 Net lending (-)/borrowing (+) of households
  32. 14 Net lending (-)/borrowing (+) of non-financial corporations
  33. 2 Current taxes on income, wealth, etc., and miscellaneous current transfers received by government from non-financial corporations
  34. 2 Miscellaneous current transfers within non-financial corporations
  35. 2 Net non-life insurance premiums received by financial corporations from non-financial corporations; miscellaneous current transfers from nonfinancial corporations to financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households
  36. 2 Net non-life insurance premiums received by the rest of the world from - 32 -Row Col. Contents non-financial corporations
  37. 2 Social benefits other than social transfers in kind and miscellaneous current transfers from non-financial corporations to households
  38. 3 Actual government final consumption
  39. 3 Current transfers and miscellaneous current transfers within government
  40. 3 Gross savings of government - 31 -Row Col. Contents
  41. 3 Miscellaneous current transfers from government to non-financial corporations
  42. 3 Net non-life insurance premiums received by financial corporations from government; miscellaneous current transfers from government to nonprofit institutions serving households
  43. 3 Net non-life insurance premiums, current international cooperation, miscellaneous current transfers and social benefits other than social transfers in kind received by the rest of the world from government
  44. 3 Social benefits other than social transfers in kind, social transfers in kind and miscellaneous current transfers from government to households
  45. 4 Gross savings of financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households
  46. 4 Net non-life insurance premiums received by the other countries of the rest of the world from financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households; non-life insurance claims received by the rest of the world from financial corporations
  47. 4 Non-life insurance claims and miscellaneous current transfers from financial corporations to non-financial corporations
  48. 5 Acquisitions minus disposals of non-produced non-financial assets and other capital transfers from households to the rest of the world
  49. 5 Capital taxes and other capital transfers received by government from households
  50. 6 Acquisitions minus disposals of non-produced non-financial assets and other capital transfers from non-financial corporations to the rest of the world
  51. 6 Other capital transfers from non-financial corporations to financial corporations
  52. 6 Other capital transfers from non-financial corporations to government
  53. 7 Acquisitions minus disposals of non-produced non-financial assets, investment grants and other capital transfers from government to the rest of the world
  54. 7 Gross Capital Formation by government
  55. 7 Investment grants and other capital transfers from government to nonfinancial corporations
  56. 7 Investment grants and other capital transfers from government to nonprofit institutions serving households
  57. 7 Investment grants and other capital transfers from local government to households
  58. 7 Investment grants and other capital transfers within central government
  59. 8 Acquisitions minus disposals of non-produced non-financial assets from financial corporations to the rest of the world
  60. 8 Other capital transfers from financial corporations to households
  61. 8 Other capital transfers from social security funds to non-financial corporations
  62. 9 Compensation of employees received by the rest of the world (paid to non-resident employees)
  63. 9 Imputed social contributions received by financial corporations and nonprofit institutions serving households
  64. 9 Imputed social contributions received by general government plus employers’ actual social contributions received by social security funds
  65. 9 Imputed social contributions received by non-financial corporations
  66. and salaries plus imputed social contributions received by the households
  67. Capital Formation by financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households
  68. Capital Formation by non-financial corporations
  69. Capital Formation by the enterprises classified in the household institutional sector
  70. capital transfers from financial corporations and non-profit institutions serving households to government
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