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TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND LABOR'S RELATIVE SHARE: THE MECHANIZATION OF U.S. COTTON PRODUCTION

By Marshall A. Martin and Jr. Joseph Havlicek

Abstract

Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies,

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Citations

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