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CHANGES IN THE RELATIVE EARNINGS GAP BETWEEN NATIVES AND IMMIGRANTS ALONG THE U.S.-MEXICO BORDER

By Alberto Dávila and Marie T. Mora

Abstract

Using 1990 and 2000 U.S. census data, this study investigates changes in immigrant/native earnings disparities for workers in U.S. cities along the international border with Mexico "vis-à-vis" the U.S. interior during the 1990s. Our findings-based on estimating earnings functions and employing the Juhn-Murphy-Pierce (1993, "JPE") wage decomposition technique-indicate that the average earnings of Mexican immigrants along the U.S.-Mexico border improved relative to those accrued by their counterparts in the U.S. interior and by otherwise similar U.S.-born Mexican Americans between 1990 and 2000. However, when comparing Mexican-born workers to U.S.-born non-Hispanic whites, the immigrant border-earnings penalty remained statistically unchanged. Copyright (c) Blackwell Publishing, Inc. 2008

DOI identifier: 10.1111/j.1467-9787.2008.00562.x
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