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Regulation versus Competition on European Financial Markets

By Alexandra Horobet and Livia Ilie

Abstract

Competition is the mechanism that helps companies, institutions and markets to become more productive and efficient. one of the main obstacles to economic growth is represented by the policies that hinder competition. Excessive protection may create a handicap for the European economic system which will have not all the necessary instruments to face the increasing competition between companies, countries, economic regions.The paper aims at analyzing the relationship between regulation, competition and economic performances applied to European capital markets, as opposed to US capital markets.regulation, competition, capital market, integration

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