Location of Repository

Women's Schooling, Home Teaching, and Economic Growth

By Jere Behrman, Andrew D. Foster, Mark Rosenzweig and Prem Vahsishtha
OAI identifier:

Suggested articles

Preview

Citations

  1. (1997). A Survey of Theories of the Family,”
  2. (1971). Absolute values of robust t-ratios in parentheses.Table 1 Relationship of Male and Female Schooling and Literacy to HYV Adoption: ML Logit Estimates,
  3. (1995). An Eclectic Approach to Estimating the Determinants of Achievement in Jamaican Primary Education," World Bank Economic Review 9:2
  4. (1986). Cleaning House: New Perspectives on Households and Economic Development,"
  5. (1984). Comment on 'Market Opportunities, Genetic Endowments, and Intrafamily Resource Distribution',"
  6. (1996). Comparative Advantage, Information, and the Allocation of Workers to Tasks: Evidence from an Agricultural Labor Market,” Review of Economic Studies
  7. (1981). Cultural Transmission and Evolution: A Quantitative Approach.
  8. (1993). Daughters, Education, and Family Budgets: Taiwan Experiences,"
  9. (1996). Decomposing the Gender Gap in Cognitive Skills in a Poor Rural Economy,"
  10. (1997). Does the Labour Market Explain Lower Female Schooling
  11. (1996). Forum for African Women Educationalists,
  12. (1993). Gender Differences in the Returns to Schooling and School Enrollment Rates in Indonesia,"
  13. (1996). Gender, Agricultural Production, and the Theory of the Household,”
  14. (1997). Generation(s) of Human Capital: Literacy in American Families,
  15. (1996). Human Development Report
  16. (1994). Intergenerational Education Mobility: Effects of Family and State in Malaysia,"
  17. (1990). Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: An Inferential Approach,"
  18. (1996). Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: Methods, Models, and Policy,
  19. (1993). Investments in the Schooling and Health of Women and Men: Quantities and Returns,"
  20. (1982). Market Opportunities, Genetic Endowments and the Intrafamily Distribution of Resources: Child Survival in Rural India,” American Economic Review,
  21. (1997). Matlab Health and Socioeconomic Survey.
  22. (1995). Returns to Education by Gender Among Wage Employees in Urban India,”
  23. (1993). Returns to Women's Education," in
  24. (1991). Risk, Schooling and the Choice of Seed Technology in Developing Countries : A Meta-Profit Function Approach,”
  25. (1994). Student Achievement and Schooling Choice in Low Income Countries: Evidence from Ghana,"
  26. (1995). The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings,"
  27. (1995). The Economics of Polygyny in Sub-Saharan Africa: Female Productivity and the Demand for Wives in Cote d'Ivoire,"
  28. (1993). The Rising Price of Husbands: A Hedonic Analysis of Dowry Increases in Rural India,"
  29. (1995). Why are there Returns to Schooling? American Economic Review, Papers and
  30. (1993). Women's Education in Developing Countries: Barriers, Benefits, and Policies, Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, Published for the World Bank.
  31. (1993). Women’s Education in Developing Countries: An Overview,” in
  32. (1990). World Development Report: Poverty,

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.