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The experimental line in fiction

By Michael Green

Abstract

This chapter considers what J. M. Coetzee has called ‘the experimental line’ within the works of black and white writers in English and Afrikaans, showing how, during the apartheid years, its playfulness and experimentalism was often passed over in critical accounts intent on identifying a literature of witness and solidarity. It also traces the continuing ‘line’ of experimentation in post-apartheid literature

Topics: Q200, Q300, T500, T900
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Year: 2012
OAI identifier: oai:nrl.northumbria.ac.uk:6914

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