Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Consequences of family and friends (social network) influences on pupils’ interest in science careers: A Scottish Perspective

By Susan Rodrigues and Divya Jindal-Snape

Abstract

The project reported in this article investigated the views of 546 pupils aged 14 - 15 years drawn from 5 schools in one Scottish city. This article reports on the influence of the family and friends element of Bourdieu’s, Coleman’s and Putnam’s social networks and civic norms, on pupils’ views about science careers. Coleman (1988) suggests that social networks and civic norms influence attainment and engagement. Buchmann and Dalton (2000) suggest that social networks and civic norms mediate effects of socio-economic background and ability on aspirations. The pupils completed a questionnaire. Findings illustrate the even though pupils wish to have high earning careers and believe that scientists are high earners, the views of their parents and to a lesser extent, friends influence their attitudes towards pursuing a career in science

Topics: X900
Publisher: Academic Journals
Year: 2010
OAI identifier: oai:nrl.northumbria.ac.uk:1275

Suggested articles

Citations

  1. (1981). Adolescent Agreement with perceived Maternal and Parental Educational Goals.
  2. (2004). Caribbean Families, Social Capital and Young People’s diasporic identities. doi
  3. (1994). Foundations of Social Theory. Cambridge MA:
  4. (2002). Interpersonal influences and educational aspirations in twelve countries: the importance of institutional context. doi
  5. (1973). Parental Education for the Parental role in Children’s Vocational Choices.
  6. (2003). Science and Training doi
  7. (2002). SETT for Success: The supply of people with science technology, engineering and mathematics skills. http://www.hmtreasury.gov.uk/media/643/FB/ACF11FD.pdf Schneider B, Stevenson D
  8. (1988). Social Capital in the Creation of Human Capital. Supplement S95-S120 doi
  9. (2000). Social Capital-Critical Perspectives Oxford:
  10. (2007). Social Capital, Social Inclusion and Changing School Contexts: A Scottish Perspective. doi
  11. (1997). The Forms of Capital. In doi
  12. (2001). The influence of family social capital on educational achievement. doi
  13. (2001). The Public Attitudes to Science and Engineering; Scottish Comparison Report.

To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.