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Normalising the unthinkable: the British press, torture and the human rights of terror suspects

By John Tulloch

Abstract

This paper explores contemporary media coverage\ud of torture by examining in detail the editorial positions\ud taken on the issue of “extraordinary rendition” by UK national daily and weekly newspapers during December 2005. It explores the historic origins of the myths dominating mainstream media coverage of torture drawing on comparisons with UK press coverage of brutality by British forces in\ud previous emergencies, including conflicts in Kenya and Northern Ireland. In addition, it discusses the extent to which the contemplation of the use of torture in anti-terrorism strategies has been normalised in the process of media debate. In conclusion, the 2005 “rendition” controversy suggests that dominant myths surrounding British uses of torture are “alive and well”

Topics: P500 Journalism
Publisher: Abramis Academic
Year: 2005
OAI identifier: oai:eprints.lincoln.ac.uk:1135

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Citations

  1. (2005). All right it can work – but let’s keep the thumbscrews under lock and key, The Times, Features section, 6 December p 24 Anderson,

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