Skip to main content
Article thumbnail
Location of Repository

Interhemispheric Atlantic seesaw response during the last deglaciation

By Stephen Barker, Paula Diz, Maryline J. Vautravers, Jennifer Pike, Gregor Knorr, Ian R. Hall and Wallace S. Broecker

Abstract

The asynchronous relationship between millennial-scale temperature changes over Greenland and Antarctica during the last glacial period has led to the notion of a bipolar seesaw which acts to redistribute heat depending on the state of meridional overturning circulation within the Atlantic Ocean. Here we present new records from the South Atlantic that show rapid changes during the last deglaciation that were instantaneous (within dating uncertainty) and of opposite sign to those observed in the North Atlantic. Our results demonstrate a direct link between the abrupt changes associated with variations in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and the more gradual adjustments characteristic of the Southern Ocean. These results emphasize the importance of the Southern Ocean for the development and transmission of millennial-scale climate variability and highlight its role in deglacial climate change and the associated rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide

Topics: Marine Sciences, Meteorology and Climatology, Glaciology
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Year: 2009
DOI identifier: 10.1038/nature07770
OAI identifier: oai:nora.nerc.ac.uk:10787
Download PDF:
Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s):
  • http://www.nature.com/nature/j... (external link)
  • https://doi.org/10.1038/nature... (external link)
  • https://doi.org/10.1038/nature... (external link)
  • http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/epri... (external link)
  • Suggested articles


    To submit an update or takedown request for this paper, please submit an Update/Correction/Removal Request.