EVALUATION OF PLANT SPECIES FOR SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND CONTRIBUTION TO GREEN ROOF FUNCTION

Abstract

The evaluation of plant species for use in green roof systems is an important step in providing recommendations to the industry. In this study we investigated the ability of five species to grow and survive on a green roof in the Mid-Atlantic, and how they contributed to the performance of a green roof system. One species, Tradescantia ohiensis was found to retain more storm water than other species and an unplanted control. Three of the plants evaluated were found to reduce substrate temperatures when compared to unplanted controls during the summer months. One species, Chielanthes lanosa, was unable to survive the summer. While another, Asclepias verticillata, lost biomass over the study. Indicating both are unsuitable for use on green roofs in the Mid-Atlantic. The other species: Sedum album, Sedum kamtschaticum and Tradescantia ohiensis all survived and exhibited a positive growth rate

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oai:drum.lib.umd.edu:1903/15128Last time updated on 11/12/2016View original full text link

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