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Efficacy and Reliability of Upgraded Industrial Treatment Plant at Porto Marghera, near Venice, Italy, in Removing Nutrients and Dangerous Micropollutants from Petrochemical Wastewaters

By Verlicchi P., Cattaneo S., Marciano F., Masotti L., Vecchiato G. and Zaffaroni C.

Abstract

Chemical and petrochemical wastewaters contain a host of contaminants whose removal necessitates different treatment strategies. Indeed, regulations concerning the final discharge from industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have set more and more stringent limits as regards macro- and micropollutant content in recent decades, meaning that many WWTPs have had to be upgraded. In particular, this article discusses the WWTP for the petrochemical site at Porto Marghera, Italy, which has recently undergone modification following these legislative changes. \ud Due to the strict legal limits governing macropollutants and micropollutants, and conditioned by the lack of space necessary for a full-scale plant overhaul, the existing activated sludge tank was converted into a membrane biological reactor. \ud The paper presents experimental data collected during a five-month investigation showing the removal rates achieved by the upgraded plant for macropollutants (in particular nitrogen compounds) as well micropollutants (heavy metals, organic and inorganic dangerous compounds).\ud Chemical and petrochemical wastewaters contain a host of contaminants that require different treatment strategies. Regulation of macropollutants and micropollutants in the final discharge from industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become increasingly stringent in recent decades, requiring many WWTPs to be upgraded. This article presents an analysis of a WWTP treating petrochemicals in Porto Marghera, Italy, that recently was upgraded following legislative changes. Because of strict legal limits for macropollutants and micropollutants and a lack of space necessary for a full-scale WWTP overhaul, the existing activated sludge tank was converted into a membrane biological reactor. The paper presents experimental data collected during a five-month investigation showing the removal rates achieved by the upgraded plant for macropollutants (particularly nitrogen compounds) and micropollutants (heavy metals and organic and inorganic toxic compounds)

Topics: membrane biological reactor, nutrients, micropollutants, petrochemical wastewater, plant upgrade, Venice Lagoon
Year: 2011
DOI identifier: 10.2175/106143011X12928814445177
OAI identifier: oai:iris.unife.it:11392/1409926
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